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Course Descriptions

◆ General Education course

ACC: Accounting

ACC-111 Introduction to Accounting

3 credits—This course covers the terminology, concepts, and procedures involved in financial accounting for businesses. Topics include accounting for cash and accounting for payroll.

Lecture Hours: 48

ACC-115 Introduction to Accounting

4 credits—This course presents the fundamental concepts, procedures, and applications of the accounting cycle for service and merchandising businesses. The proprietorship form of ownership is studied. Topics include the special journals, payroll accounting, and accounting for cash.

Lecture Hours: 64

ACC-116 Introduction to Accounting II

4 credits—This course is a continuation of Introduction to Accounting (ACC-115) emphasizing the principles of accrual accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting for corporations and a manufacturing business. Topics include accounting for receivables, inventory, and long-term assets.

Lecture Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-115 or ACC-131.

ACC-131 Principles of Accounting I

4 credits—This course is an introduction to basic financial accounting concepts and procedures for service and merchandising businesses. Topics included are the accounting cycle; accounting systems; financial statements; accounting for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant assets, partnerships, corporations, and bonds.

Lecture Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in MAT-063 or equivalent placement math score.

ACC-132 Principles of Accounting II

4 credits—The course continues to address topics in financial accounting that began in Principles of Accounting I. Primary emphasis is on managerial accounting and the corporate form of ownership. Topics include accounting for bonds, the statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis. Managerial accounting topics include job order and process cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and standard cost systems. Capital investment analysis and activity-based costing are also addressed.

Lecture Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in ACC-131.

ACC-160 Payroll Accounting

2 credits—This course is a study of payroll from payroll laws to journalizing payroll transactions. Emphasis is on computing wages, social security taxes, income tax withholding, unemployment taxes, and journalizing payroll transactions with hands-on experience in preparing all the necessary monthly, quarterly and annual reports. An accounting payroll project will provide hands-on experience in preparing a payroll.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in ACC-115 or ACC-131.

ACC-190 Financial Analysis

2 credits—This course provides the student with a general framework of corporate finance. The emphasis is limited to financial analysis of business performance and evaluation of alternative choices for investments and working capital.

Lecture Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-132 or ACC-116.

ACC-222 Cost Accounting

4 credits—This course provides an introduction to the accounting concepts of manufacturing systems. In addition to job order and process costing systems, profit planning and control programs are emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-132 or ACC-116.

ACC-231 Intermediate Accounting I

4 credits—This course emphasizes accounting theory as students work with detailed applications of various balance sheet and income statement accounts. Applicable generally accepted accounting principles are emphasized as they relate to each subject area. Time values of money concepts are also introduced.

Lecture Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-132 or ACC-116.

ACC-232 Intermediate Accounting II

4 credits—This course continues the detailed applications that began in Intermediate Accounting I. Emphasis is on corporate debt and equity. The statement of cash flows is addressed extensively as well as the accounting for business combinations. The course will conclude with financial statement analysis.

Lecture Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-231 Intermediate Accounting I.

ACC-265 Income Tax Accounting

4 credits—Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the federal tax system. The student will gain hands on experience preparing the most current tax forms for sole proprietorship businesses and individuals. Tax planning is addressed as it relates to the current and forthcoming year. Students will be provided with an opportunity to use computer software to prepare returns.

Lecture Hours: 64

ACC-310 Computer Accounting

2 credits—Provides students with practice and application of the accounting cycle on microcomputers. Topics include ledgers, accounts receivable and payable, payroll, inventory and depreciation. Integrated software packages are introduced.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in ACC-115 or ACC-131.

ACC-311 Computer Accounting

3 credits—This course presents an introduction to a computerized accounting system. Two popular software packages will be used to accumulate, classify, and summarize data about a business.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-115 or ACC-131.

ACC-360 Accounting Spreadsheets

2 credits—This course provides the student with an in depth working knowledge of how to use an integrated spreadsheet program to assist in routine jobs. Writing formulas is emphasized along with planning and creating spreadsheets.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in BCA-205.

ACC-801 Payroll Accounting

1 credits—This course involves the study of the federal, as well as the state forms and regulations concerning payroll. Students will be completing a comprehensive payroll simulation.

Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-115 or ACC-131.

ACC-803 Accounting Simulations

1 credits—This course provides hands-on experience using a manual and computerized simulation of an accounting cycle. The proprietorship form of business, accrual accounting and other concepts learned in the first accounting course will be the basis for the simulation.

Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ACC-115 or ACC-131.

ACC-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

Can be completed for up to three credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

ADM: Administrative Assistant

ADM-105 Introduction to Keyboarding

1 credits—This course presents the technique and development of touch keyboarding. Basic functions of a computer are introduced with emphasis on learning alphabetic, numeric and symbolic keys, and the numeric keypad. The minimum competency of 25 net words per minute, with no more than five errors per timing, on 3 five-minute timed writings is required.

Lab Hours: 32

ADM-108 Keyboarding Skill Development

1 credits—The skill building process is continued. This course assists students to improve speed and accuracy. The minimum competency of 40 net words per minute, with no more than five errors per timing, on 3 five-minute timed writings is required.

Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in ADM-105.

ADM-131 Office Calculators

1 credits—The 10-key electronic calculator is used in business related applications. The emphasis is on speed and accuracy as the student performs the basic arithmetical procedures.

Lab Hours: 32

ADM-148 Transcription

2 credits—This course builds and strengthens skills in machine transcription. Students are provided instruction for using transcription equipment with emphasis on language skills, including spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage. Emphasis will be on editing, proofreading, and mailability of documents.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in BCA-134 and ADM-105.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in ADM-159 Proofreading and Editing.

ADM-159 Proofreading and Editing

3 credits—This course emphasizes the applications designed to sharpen skills in detecting and correcting errors in written communications including memos, letters, reports, databases, presentation slides, advertisements, and spreadsheets. It also introduces the student to proofreading and editing skills necessary when using current and new technology (i.e. email messages and voice recognition).

Lecture Hours: 48

ADM-162 Office Procedures

3 credits—This course provides preparation for employment in today's rapidly changing office environment by exposing a variety of topics including the working environment, oral and written communication, and administrative support services.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in BCA-134 and ADM-159.

ADM-180 Administrative Management

3 credits—Administrative management is studied including organization, site location, office layout, environment, communication processes, job analysis, job evaluation, salary administration, performance appraisal, and employer/employee relations.

Lecture Hours: 48

ADM-200 Legal Document Processing

3 credits—This course familiarizes students with various fields of law and the proper preparation of legal documents utilized in each. Students will apply various skills in preparing legal documents, including transcription skills, communication skills, problem-solving skills, and technical skills.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in ADM-105, BCA-134, and ADM-148.

ADM-203 Legal Office Concepts and Procedures

3 credits—This course provides an understanding of the legal office environment and offers a broad spectrum of legal concepts and procedures.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in BCA-134.

ADM-208 Legal Terminology

3 credits—This course is designed to familiarize students with the most commonly used legal terms in today's workplace. It emphasizes correct spelling and defining of legal terms.

Lecture Hours: 48

ADM-222 Career Capstone

3 credits—Career skills, techniques and strategies that will assist the student in securing and maintaining employment are developed. Students will learn the fundamentals of the job search process, including interviewing skills and employment correspondence. International, legal, and ethical issues as well as technological developments affecting workplace communication skills are incorporated throughout the course. An individual capstone portfolio will be created. It is required that this course be taken the semester in which the student will be graduating.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): Can only be taken in the term in which the student will be completing their program of study.

ADN: Associate Degree Nursing

ADN-121 Transition to Professional Nursing

2 credits—This course focuses on the associate degree nurse as transition occurs from the licensed practical nurse role to the registered nurse role. Major units in this course include an overview of ethical, legal and professional role/responsibilities of the registered nurse, history of nursing, nursing process and critical thinking, as well as an introduction to APA writing style and research.

Admission without conditions to the Associate Degree Nursing program for the current semester.

Lecture Hours: 32

Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-531.

ADN-122 Advanced Nursing Skills

2 credits—This course provides supervised practice of advanced nursing skills in a laboratory setting. The student is assisted in gaining skill and accuracy through demonstration, supervised practice and evaluation

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Associate Degree Nursing program.

Co-requisite(s): ADN-123 Physical Assessment

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-531 Advanced Adult Health Nursing I.

ADN-123 Physical Assessment

2 credits—This course covers basic physical assessment with history taking and data collection, analysis and planning for care, nursing interventions and documentation.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Associate Degree Nursing program. This course begins the 3 year time limit for completion of the ADN curriculum. A minimum grade of C in BIO-168.

Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-122 Advanced Nursing Skills.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-531 Advanced Adult Health Nursing I.

ADN-315 Professional Roles of Nursing Practice

2 credits—This course focuses on the role of professional nursing, the implementation of leadership and managerial aspects within the nursing discipline. This course will discuss ethical and legal issues, roles of the registered nurse, the nursing process, critical thinking, and Evidence Based Practice guidelines within nursing practice. Preparation for the licensing exam is also included.

Lecture Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in PNN-214, PNN-215, PNN-216, PNN-217, BIO-151, SPC-101, ADN-121, ADN-122, ADN-123, ADN-281, and ADN-531.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in BIO-186.

ADN-410 Advanced Nursing in OB and PEDS

5 credits—This course provides comprehensive care for childbearing and pediatric clients in wellness and illness with special emphasis on health interruptions and variations and the nursing process needed to meet these variations. Clinical experiences are provided in selective acute care and community settings.

Lecture Hours: 48 Clinic Hours: 96

Prerequisite(s): Valid Iowa LPN license. A minimum grade of C in ADN-121, ADN-122, ADN-123, and ADN-531.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-315.

ADN-452 Complex Health Concepts Mod A

5 credits—This course is a study of the concepts of health and illness and of the nursing process in providing comprehensive nursing care for adults requiring advanced medical and surgical care. The content includes a review of shock, fluid, electrolyte, acid base, respiratory, and endocrine disorders. Clinical experiences are provided in selected acute care settings.

This course requires admission to the Associate Degree Nursing Program. Must complete the Associate Degree Nursing curriculum within 3 years of starting this course.

Lecture Hours: 48 Clinic Hours: 96

ADN-453 Complex Health Concepts Mod B

5 credits—This course is a study of the concepts of health and illness and the nursing process in providing comprehensive nursing care for adults requiring advanced medical and surgical care. The content includes a review of cardiac disorders, vascular disorders, digestive disorders, neurologic disorders, and hematologic disorders. Clinical experiences are provided in selected acute care settings.

Lecture Hours: 48 Clinic Hours: 96

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-452.

ADN-455 Complex Health Concepts Mod C

3 credits—This course is a study of the concepts of health and illness and of the nursing process in providing comprehensive nursing care for adults requiring advanced medical and surgical care. The content includes a review of immunity, musculoskeletal, thermal injuries, oncology, and renal disorders. Clinical experiences are provided in selected acute care settings.

Lecture Hours: 32 Clinic Hours: 48

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-452 and ADN-315.

ADN-458 Nursing Care of Special Populations

7 credits—This course builds on the concepts of previous nursing courses with an emphasis on the care of high risk obstetric, pediatric and mental health patients. The focus will be on health promotion, ethical/legal considerations, family-centered care and common alterations seen in high risk obstetric, pediatric, and mental health patients.

Lecture Hours: 80 Clinic Hours: 96

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-121, ADN-122, ADN-123, and ADN-452.

ADN-477 Psychiatric Nursing

5 credits—This course focuses on the study and application of modern concepts of psychiatric nursing and effective interactions with people. The student will respond therapeutically to clients with maladaptive behaviors through utilization of the nursing process by applying the principles of mental health and psychiatric nursing. This course will also review the NCLEX material.

Lecture Hours: 48 Clinic Hours: 96

Prerequisite(s): Valid Iowa LPN license. A minimum grade of C in ADN-123 and ADN-315.

ADN-499 Passage to Professional Practice

1 credits—This course will prepare the student to enter professional practice. Personal wellness and preparation for licensure will be covered

Lecture Hours: 16

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-315, ADN-453, ADN-455, and ADN-458.

ADN-532 Advanced Adult Health Nursing II

6 credits—This course is a continuation of Advanced Adult Health Nursing I. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process in providing comprehensive care of the complex medical-surgical adult patient. The content includes cardiac, peripheral vascular, digestive, hematologic, oncologic, urinary and neurologic disorders. Clinical experiences are provided in acute care and community settings. Selected experience in the nurse manager role is included.

Lecture Hours: 64 Clinic Hours: 96

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-121, ADN-122, ADN-123, and ADN-531.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of C in ADN-315.

ADN-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

AGA: Agriculture–Agronomy

AGA-114 Principles of Agronomy

3 credits—This course presents introductory principles of plant-soil-climate relationships in crop production, plant anatomy, crop plant classification and identification, crop physiology, climate, soils, soil water, tillage and seeding, plant breeding, seed and grain quality, weeds, insects, crop diseases, crop management, harvesting and storage. Global Positioning and Geographic Information Systems in crop systems is discussed.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGA-154 Fundamentals of Soil Science

3 credits—This course presents information on soils and soil fertility, land use, soil formation, soil types, soil testing, soil physical characteristics, soil classes, primary nutrients, secondary nutrients, micro-nutrients, fertilizer materials, fertilizing, and using soil test information. The use of Global Positioning and Geographic Information Systems in recording soil data is covered.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGA-214 Cash Grains

3 credits—This course introduces the production of Iowa's main cash crops; corn and soybeans. Units include: crop history, crop development, seed selection, fertilization, insect and weed control, harvesting, grain handling, marketing, storage and the economic importance of each crop. New and experimental production practices are discussed for practical application.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGA-284 Pesticide Application Certification

3 credits—This course will introduce students to the safe use of agricultural chemicals. Safety precautions and prevention of chemical exposure will be stressed when discussing types of chemicals, usage, application, equipment, and mixing. First aid and responding to chemical contamination will also be discussed. This course prepares the students for taking the Iowa Commercial Pesticide Applicators Certification Exam.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGA-376 Integrated Pest Management

3 credits—This course is designed to make application and use of some materials learned in other courses. Decision making as it deals with the total cropping plan is stressed. An individual will determine from observation weed problems, plant populations, disease problems, insect problems, do yield checks, make recommendations for handling any problems.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGA-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

AGB: Agriculture–Farm Management

AGB-101 Agricultural Economics

3 credits—This course introduces students to basic concepts in economics, including various aspects of an economy-like agriculture, industry, population, food supply, government policies and physical environmental affect on each other and the economy as a whole. Resources used in agricultural production, organization price determination, supply, demand, and profit modernization is studied.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGB-235 Introduction to Agriculture Markets

3 credits—This course provides the student with an introduction to grain merchandising and farm marketing. It is taught from the standpoint of a country elevator; however, the same principles apply to many other aspects of the grain industry. We emphasize the elevators relationship and responsibility to its customers. The basic fundamentals of marketing are discussed along with the more advanced aspects of managing basis positions, basis trading and managing risks. Some prior knowledge of country elevators and the futures market is useful but not required.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGB-303 Agriculture Leadership

3 credits—This course is designed to enhance students? abilities in the area of leadership. The course includes activities that enable students to develop skills in communication, problem solving, committee work, and parliamentary procedure. Students may be involved in many local, state and nationally organized activities.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGB-330 Farm Business Management

3 credits—Business and economic principles applied to decision making and problem solving in the management of a farm business, cash flow, partial, enterprise, and whole farm budgeting. Information systems for farm accounting, analysis, and control. Obtaining and managing land, capital, and labor resources. Alternatives for farm business organization and risk management.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGB-331 Entrepreneurship in Agriculture

3 credits—This course introduces students to basic principles of organizing, financing, and managing a business. Including product merchandising and marketing, personnel management, credits, and risk management.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGB-336 Agricultural Selling

3 credits—This course presents aspects of the sales process including: selling success, types of sales questions, creating the selling climate, motivation, attitude, referral prospecting, no referral prospecting, phone sales, sales presentations and demonstrations, qualifying the prospect, overcoming objectiveness, closing twelve power closes, and sales paper work.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGC: Agriculture–Comprehensive–Miscellaneous

AGC-103 Ag Computers

3 credits—This course will introduce students to the hardware, software, word processing, database and spreadsheet programs, as well as various utility software. Applications of various agricultural management uses are covered throughout. Networks, telecommunication, Global Positioning and Geographic Information Systems are also introduced.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGC-999 Study Abroad

1 credits—This course explores relative differences between the student's country and study abroad country with emphasis in agriculture. Topics include history, geography, culture, food, language, and agriculture topics. May be taken for up to 5 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

AGH: Agriculture–Horticulture

AGH-107 Horticulture Lab

1 credits—Horticulture lab offers students the opportunity to work in the Hawkeye horticulture laboratory under the supervision of an instructor. Students will be assigned projects and will be responsible for completing them on a timely basis for a limited time. This course may be repeated up to three times with different content.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-112 Introduction to Turfgrass Management

3 credits—This course introduces the types of grass species and their uses; their growth habits, and development as a unique plant species. Proper culture and establishment procedures are studied, as well as their importance to the environment.

Lecture Hours: 48

AGH-119 Herbaceous Plant Materials

2 credits—This course covers identification, adaptation, cultural characteristics and uses of selected annuals, perennials and bulbs suitable for use in landscape and gardens in Iowa. Students will identify the plants covered and will also be required to incorporate them into four flower garden design projects.

Lecture Hours: 32

AGH-123 Woody Plant Materials

3 credits—The identification, morphology, landscape use and culture of native and nonnative woody plants of the Upper Midwest. First part of course will include emphasis on deciduous plants. Last part of course will include emphasis on evergreens.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-134 Greenhouse Production

3 credits—This course explores various employment opportunities in the greenhouse career field. Production theories and practices are studied. Emphasis is on proper techniques of watering, potting, transplanting, fertilizing and various other aspects of greenhouse production. Cultural practices used to produce the most common greenhouse crops are also covered.

Lecture Hours: 48

AGH-140 Equipment Operations

2 credits—This course introduces the general care and use of horticultural equipment in turf and landscape maintenance, and construction. Emphasis is on operation, preventative maintenance performed by the operator, daily lubrications and minor adjustments. Students will also mount and dismount accessories used on the equipment. Safe operation of machinery is emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-142 Landscape Construction

3 credits—Principles and practices of landscape construction will be explained. Curriculum encompasses process from initial client contact to installation of plant material and hardscape. Laboratory work in the course involves landscape installation using various materials and techniques

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-143 Equipment Repair

3 credits—This course is an introduction to basic maintenance of mechanical, hydraulic, and electrical systems of gasoline and diesel engines. Maintenance, up-keep and repair techniques on reel mowers, rotary mowers, and other horticulture equipment are covered.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-152 Landscape Design Techniques

3 credits—Concepts and applications of landscape design principles are utilized in completing landscape plans. Emphasis is placed on the design principles for preparing, evaluating and selling landscape plans.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-159 Landscape Graphics

2 credits—This course is an introduction to landscape graphics associated with drafting equipment and materials, and computer aided drawings

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in AGH-152 Landscape Design Techniques.

AGH-161 Irrigation Systems

3 credits—This course presents various types of irrigation equipment: heads, valves, controllers, pipe, and the accessories used in an irrigation system. The course presents the function of water, its relationships to plants and soil, and an introduction to water hydraulics.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-200 Landscape Estimating and Bidding

2 credits—This course focuses on the fundamentals of creating a landscape project estimate including material take-offs, plant pricing, labor rates, measuring, reading landscape plans and math calculations.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-211 Advanced Turfgrass Management

3 credits—The course provides opportunities for students to learn techniques of golf course management and operation. Proper construction of specific golf course areas such as: greens, trees, bunkers, basic golf course design is presented. Budgets, irrigation, maintenance and an integrated pest management program are presented.

Lecture Hours: 48

AGH-221 Principles of Horticulture

3 credits—This course provides students with an overall view of how man utilizes horticulture plant materials. Topics covered are fruits, vegetables, ornamental plants and their proper use and care. Proper culture and environmental conditions are also included.

Lecture Hours: 48

AGH-233 Plant Propagation I

3 credits—Introduces students to techniques used in reproducing plants through sexual and asexual methods. Seedlings, vegetative cuttings, grafts and buddings are practiced in the laboratory.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-270 Nursery Production

2 credits—This course introduces the student to theory and techniques of springtime nursery production. Students will plant trees, shrubs and evergreens in the horticulture lab nursery, and participate in other nursery cultural practices, such as: weed control, pruning, cultivation, etc.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-273 Nursery Management

3 credits—Basic management functions are applied to a plant nursery. Advertising, harvest and sale of trees and shrubs from the school nursery provide students with hands-on experiences. Chemical selection for pest control in a nursery will also be covered. Students will be involved in planning the planting of the horticulture lab nursery.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-280 Botany for Horticulture

3 credits—This course presents the basic structure of plant life, plant nomenclature, botanical terminology, the function of plant parts: cells, tissues, roots, and leaves. The physiological processes of plant life; osmosis, photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, reproduction and the basic principles of genetics, and the plants metabolism is discussed.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-281 Arboriculture

3 credits—A study of tree culture with emphasis on propagation, pruning, transplanting, pest control, urban environment concerns and recognition of hazards and liabilities. Methods of evaluation of values of trees also studied.

Lecture Hours: 48

AGH-292 Garden Center Management

3 credits—Display, promotion and merchandising in the modern garden center will be stressed. Problems of distribution functions of marketing and their costs will be studied. Management's role in organizing a business and financial planning will be discussed.

Lecture Hours: 48

AGH-400 Athletic Field Maintenance

3 credits—Studies specific sport facilities utilizing turf grasses including football, soccer, field hockey, baseball, and softball fields. Techniques of operation, management, maintenance, budgets, construction, and irrigation will be covered.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH-425 Grounds Maintenance

3 credits—This course introduced basic maintenance practices used on a golf course; golf course etiquette, procedures such as top dressing, aerifying, mowing, verticutting, fertilizing, watering, and changing cups on a green. Introduces maintenance practices used in sports complexes, parks and recreation areas, and commercial and industrial grounds.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGM: Agriculture–Mechanics

AGM-104 Electricity

4 credits—This course is an in-depth study of theory in the diagnosing and repair of electrical components and circuitry.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AGM-111 Gas Engine Rebuild

4 credits—This course covers the theory of gas engines and the construction, diagnosis, and repair of all the systems. Fuel, ignition, and supportive systems are also included.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AGM-113 Hydraulics I

3 credits—This course covers theory and symbols of hydraulic components. Testing and repair of components is performed according to manufacturer's specifications.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

AGM-124 Technical Procedures for Power Mechanics Techs

3 credits—Identifies the general knowledge and procedures used by power technicians. Covers tool selection, general shop safety, fire safety and forklift operation.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

AGM-126 Diesel Engine Sub Systems

3 credits—A study of diesel fuel systems, air intake systems, cooling systems and exhaust systems.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): Must be an Electronic Engineering Technology with a Mechanical Emphasis student. A minimum grade of D- in EGT-144.

AGM-128 Fundamentals of Diesel Engine

5 credits—Students are introduced to diesel engine application, design, construction, theory and operating principles of diesel engines. This course also covers diagnosis, disassembly, and assembly of diesel engines.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 128

Prerequisite(s): Must be an Electronic Engineering Technology with a Mechanical Emphasis student. A minimum grade of D- in EGT-144.

AGM-142 Diesel Power Transfer Systems

4 credits—Students are introduced to application, design, construction, theory and operating principles of transmission, differentials and final drives.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 96

Prerequisite(s): Must be an Electronic Engineering Technology with a Mechanical Emphasis student. A minimum grade of D- in EGT-144.

AGM-224 Hydraulics II

4 credits—This course covers theory and symbols of hydraulic systems. Testing and repair of hydraulic systems is performed with the use of meters and gauges for proper diagnosis.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGM-333.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGM-113.

AGM-327 Equipment Maintenance

7 credits—This course presents background on theory of operation, diagnosis, and repair of brakes and suspension systems. Students gain knowledge and skill in performing preventive maintenance, service, and inspection of equipment. Arc welding and flame cutting will also be taught. Instruction will also cover use of computers for maintenance scheduling.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 128

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGM-107, AGM-113, AGM-104, DSL-447, and DSL-377.

AGM-333 Electronics

3 credits—This course is a continuing study of electricity in electronic components covering circuitry, diagnosis and repair.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGM-124.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGM-104.

AGM-408 Power Transfer Systems

7 credits—A study of the power train from the clutch through the rear driving axles. Emphasis is placed on clutch types, transmissions, and drive axles. Key goals of the course are failure analysis and troubleshooting malfunctions.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 128

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGM-104, AGM-113, AGM-124, AGM-333, and AGM-224.

AGM-417 Ag Equipment Repair

7 credits—This course is designed to give students the opportunity to apply competencies previously achieved to repair and service projects. Also included is theory and operation, diagnosis, and repair of heating and air conditioning systems. Instruction will also cover use of computers for maintenance scheduling.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 128

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGM-408.

AGM-932 Internship

8 credits—Students will work on-site at a local industry under the direction of a supervisor. This course may be taken for 1-8 credits.

Lecture Hours: 0 Co-op Hours: 512

Prerequisite(s): Completion of the Electromechanical Engineering Technology program. A minimum grade of D- in AGM-128.

AGP: Agriculture–Precision Ag

AGP-333 Precision Farming Systems

3 credits—Fundamental processes of Global Positioning System (GPS) with emphasis on its application to agriculture will be covered. General technical aspects of the GPS satellites, differential correction, and hardware will be covered. The specific application of this technology in agriculture for mapping, navigation, variable rate technology (VRT), and data collection will be discussed and demonstrated on the farm laboratory.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGP-340 Foundations of GIS and GPS

3 credits—This course will introduce fundamental processes of Global Positioning System (GPS) including technical aspects of the GPS satellites, differential correction, and hardware. The specific application of this technology for mapping, navigation, variable rate technology (VRT), and data collection will be discussed and demonstrated. Fundamental processes of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will also be introduced, including file formats, data base management, spatial analysis and manipulation of data.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGP-401 Introduction to GIS Software

1 credits—This course provides a conceptual overview and hands-on experience using the software, giving one the background knowledge to quickly take advantage of Arc GIS Software's powerful display and query capabilities. Students will learn basic Arc GIS Software functionality. Students become familiar with the Arc GIS Software user interface and use Arc GIS Software to create, edit, display, query and analyze geographic and tabular data and create maps and charts for use electronically and in print form.

Lecture Hours: 16

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGC-103.

AGP-436 Advanced Precision Farming: Hardware

3 credits—This course will focus on the installation, operation, and troubleshooting of precision farming hardware components. Students will learn how to install displays, GPS equipment, and various other components used within precision agriculture. Students will properly operate various precision agriculture hardware systems such as displays, variable rate controllers, and GPS equipment. Special attention will be given to training students to troubleshoot problems and learn how to develop cognitive problem solving skills.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGP-450 Fundamentals of GIS

3 credits—Fundamental processes of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with emphasis in its application to agriculture will be covered. File formats, data base management, spatial analysis and manipulation of data will be covered thoroughly. Comparisons of GIS and mapping software, and conversions between formats will also be discussed. The lab portion will concentrate on using georeferenced data from mapping and yield monitoring to develop maps from which a VRT prescription will be synthesized.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS: Agriculture–Animal Science

AGS-113 Survey of the Animal Industry

3 credits—This course introduces students to the species and breeds of domestic livestock and development of an appreciation for the principles of livestock production, and issues facing product marketing. Topics include: breeds, basic management and marketing of farm animals, composition, evaluation and marketing of farm animals, composition, evaluation and marketing of animal products; including beef and dairy cattle, horses, goats, poultry, sheep and swine.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS-211 Issues Facing Animal Science

2 credits—Overview of the factors that define contemporary ethical and scientifically based issues facing animal agriculture. Life skills development will be incorporated.

Lecture Hours: 32

AGS-216 Equine Science

3 credits—This course presents the basic management and production practices for horses including nutrition, health care, facilities, reproductive management, breeding and evaluation. The course is designed for students wanting to learn how to care for their own horse or for other owners? horses as a herdsman or in a stable.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS-218 Domestic Animal Physiology

4 credits—Introduction to the functional anatomy and physiological activities governing the animal body through discussion and observation via video of the various body systems; including cells, senses, nerves, skeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive urinary, muscular reproductive and endocrinology. Fundamentals of identification, prevention, and treatment of various common disease problems. This course presents a sound preventative approach to animal health and husbandry as it relates to body health, form and function.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGS-113.

AGS-225 Swine Science

3 credits—This course provides an understanding of the principles involved with comprehensive swine management; selection to marketing. Emphasis will be placed on business aspects, production systems, facilities, health, record systems, and analysis. Field trips and guest speakers will be included. Hands-on training will be included through the swine-teaching herd.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS-226 Beef Cattle Science

3 credits—This course prepares students to integrate production principles. Management principles involved with comprehensive beef cattle production will be emphasized. Topics included: overview of the industry, budgeting, record analysis, principles of bull management, cow and heifer management practices, preconditioning programs, feedlot management and marketing. Students receive hands-on experience working with the school teaching herd plus field trips and guest speakers.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS-272 Foods of Animal Origin

5 credits—An introduction to contemporary practices in the meat industry with a focus on production, processing and preservation of safe, wholesome, nutritious and palatable animal derived products (meat, dairy, and eggs).

Lecture Hours: 64 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGS-113.

AGS-275 Food Safety and Analysis

3 credits—An introduction to food quality control/assurance and establishment of decision-making processes, looking at potential hazards in the food system along with ways to ensure safety of products. The 3 modules of this course will be 1) Food hazards 2) HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points) and 3) Analysis for potential contamination.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS-305 Livestock Evaluation

3 credits—This course develops the student's potential in livestock selection with emphasis placed on the evaluation of breeding animal as well as market animals. The course emphasizes the visual appraisal and the carcass evaluation of beef, swine, and sheep. Production records and grading, and wholesale and retail cuts will be studied.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS-319 Animal Nutrition

3 credits—This course introduces students to the underlying principles of livestock nutrition through discussion of nutrition information, digestive systems, feedstuffs and ration balancing. Nutritional principles, digestive systems, composition and nutritional characteristics of common feedstuffs, ration formulation and recommended feeding programs of farm animals, including beef and dairy cattle, horses, poultry, sheep and swine will be emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

AGT: Agriculture–Technology

AGT-700 Special Topics: Agriculture Education

1 credits—This course is designed for secondary agriculture education professionals to develop and enhance knowledge and skills in specific emerging practices, issues, and technical content areas in the broad industry of agriculture.

Lecture Hours: 16

Prerequisite(s): Secondary Educator.

AGT-805 Employment Experience

5 credits—This course provides students with opportunities to gain on-the-job experience in the agriculture industry. Students will gain an understanding of qualities and skills needed for success in the agricultural field. Coordination and guidance will be provided by department instructors.

Co-op Hours: 320

AGT-928 Independent Study

1 credits—This course provides opportunity for a student to focus previous course work and knowledge on a special issue as well as provide for individualized exploration of topics pertinent to the student's projected objectives within any recognized discipline. Faculty consultation is required prior to registration for this course.

May be taken for up to 5 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

AGV: Agriculture–Vet Technology

AGV-101 Veterinary Assisting

3 credits—This is a Capstone course that will provide students the necessary skills and competencies that are needed to successfully perform the duties of a veterinary assistant. An example of topics covered will include; basic laboratory procedures, animal positioning, and surgical assistance. Staff and animal safety will also be covered.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGV-154 or instructor approval.

AGV-121 Veterinary Medical Terminology

2 credits—This class focuses on reading and interpreting medical charts and records, and conversing with veterinary professionals. It is designed for students to develop a working understanding of the language of veterinary medicine.

Lecture Hours: 32

AGV-123 Companion Animal

3 credits—This course provides an understanding of the basic principles of Anatomy and Physiology and Health of companion animals. Additionally the course will offer insight into social behavior and relationships. Also included will be training, housebreaking and obedience.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGV-140 Veterinary Pharmacology

3 credits—This class introduces the student to small animal pharmaceuticals. Learning is centered on the use, dosage, administration, handling, and storage of commonly used drugs used in small and large animal veterinary practices.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AGS-218.

AGV-154 Veterinary Reception and Administration Skills

4 credits—This class introduces the student to means necessary to establish a working relationship with clients in the veterinary field. Familiarizes students with software used in veterinary practice.

Lecture Hours: 64

ANT: Anthropology

ANT-105 Cultural Anthropology

3 credits—This course introduces the student to a comparative study of societies around the world. In this course cultural similarities and differences are explored to illustrate how human beings construct and conduct their existence. It emphasizes the origin and maintenance of the human species by studying its evolution, cultural development, ecology, kinship, organizations, and symbolic expressions. (Same as SOC-208)

Lecture Hours: 48

ART: Art

ART-101 Art Appreciation

3 credits—This course is an examination of the value, esthetic pleasures, structure, function, and history of art. The course explores sculpture, painting, film, drawing, printmaking, photography, ceramics, and architecture. Field trips to galleries allow students the opportunity to personally experience significant visual art.

Lecture Hours: 48

ART-120 2-D Design

3 credits—This course introduces students to the principles of design on the two-dimensional plane. Students are instructed in conceptual thinking, content and art practices, and exposed to design, color theory, and organizational principals. An introduction to materials and practice through the disciplines of drawing, painting, printmaking and collage are part of the conceptualization process offered in this curriculum.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART-123 3-D Design

3 credits—This course introduces students to the principles of design on the three-dimensional plane. Students are instructed in conceptual thinking, content and art practices, and exposed to the elements of art/design and organizational principles through the utilization of space. An introduction to materials and practice through the disciplines of drawing, designing and drafting are part of the conceptualization process offered in this curriculum. Projects will revolve around paper and card construction, modeling clay, iron wire and found objects.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART-133 Drawing

3 credits—An introduction to basic drawing. Working with still life props: line, form, values, perspective and composition will be explored, using various wet and dry mediums. Concentration will be on accurate visual drawing.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART-134 Drawing II

3 credits—This course concentrates on intermediate drawing problems: Gesture, contour, proportions, mapping techniques and values are studied through the use of props and clothed models. Creative interpretation with various media and approaches are stressed.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART-143 Painting

3 credits—This course is an introduction to painting in a variety of media. Color theory, design theory and media area applied to exercises, studies, and finished paintings. Concentration is on developing skills in handling materials and personal expression through painting.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART-144 Painting II

3 credits—This course is an advanced painting course using a variety of media, with greater emphasis on self-direction. Concentration is on developing advanced skills in handling materials leading to greater abilities and personal expression through painting.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): ART-143, equivalent, or instructor approval.

ART-173 Ceramics

3 credits—A hands-on intensive introduction to clay and glaze materials, integrated with a fresh approach to building interesting forms effectively.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART-174 Ceramics II

3 credits—This course develops the methods of clay forming as a means of expression. Topics may include hand building, wheel-throwing, glazing, design and the functional and aesthetic aspects of ceramics. Upon completion, students should demonstrate improved craftsmanship and aesthetic quality in the production of ceramic art.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in ART-173.

ART-184 Photography

3 credits—This course provides an introduction to the basics of digital photography, from camera selection to its use as an art form and aesthetic medium. Content includes camera types, lenses, exposure controls, elements of composition, editing fundamentals, and the storage, printing and sharing of photographic images. It will also examine the elements of photographic theory, history and ethics. Students will be able to check out digital cameras provided by the college, or may bring their own, approved photographic equipment. In this hands-on class, students will complete specific technique-based assignments and participate in class demonstrations, discussions and critiques. Text: required. Pre-requisite: None.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART-203 Art History I

3 credits—This course is an introduction to the history of visual art and artists; prehistory through Gothic. All forms of media: painting, sculpture, drawing, architecture, ceramics, metal work, glass and others are considered in the context of time, society, and the human impulse to create.

Lecture Hours: 48

ART-204 Art History II

3 credits—This course is an introduction to the history of visual art and artists; Renaissance to the present. All forms of media: painting, sculpture, drawing, architecture, ceramics, metal work, glass, photography, film, and others are considered in the context of time, society, and the human impulse to create.

Lecture Hours: 48

ART-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

ART-928 Independent Study

1 credits—This course provides opportunity for a student to focus previous course work and knowledge on a special issue as well as provide for individualized exploration of topics pertinent to the student's projected objectives within any recognized discipline. Faculty consultation is required prior to registration for this course.

May be taken for up to 5 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

ATR: Automation Technology and Robotics

ATR-145 Applied Industrial Robotics

2 credits—This course will introduce the study of industrial robots. This hands-on course will equip students with the skills for the installation, programming, and troubleshooting of industrial robots.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

AUT: Automotive Technology

AUT-106 Introduction to Automotive Technology

2 credits—This introductory course provides an introduction to the many facets of the automotive industry to include: careers in the automotive industry, environmental concerns affecting the automotive industry, basic automotive hand tools, specialty tools, precision measuring tools, power tools and shop equipment, using service and shop manuals, and shop safety.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

AUT-109 Introduction to Automotive Technology II

2 credits—This course includes the use of hand and power tools, the understanding of electronic repair information and the importance of preventative maintenance.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

AUT-164 Automotive Engine Repair

4 credits—Basic theory of two-cycle and four-cycle gasoline engines and their application will be introduced. Disassembly, inspection and reassembly of an engine will be experienced as well as cooling, lubrication, induction, exhaust, compression and valve systems discussed. Students will develop competencies in precision measuring and services procedures.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-204 Automotive Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles

4 credits—This course covers the advanced study of automatic transmission theory and service. The student will review basic automatic transmission theory. The student will study diagnosis, disassembly, inspection, and assembly of different types of automatic transmissions and trans-axles.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-307 Automotive Manual Transmissions and Transaxles

4 credits—A comprehensive study of the Manual Transmissions/Transaxle components and their relationship to the application of power to the drive wheels of vehicles.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-315 Automotive Differentials and 4-Wheel Drive

4 credits—A comprehensive study of Differentials and Transfer Cases and their relationship to the application of power to the drive wheels of vehicles.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-404 Automotive Suspension and Steering

4 credits—Steering and suspension system operation and service procedures are covered. Emphasis is on diagnosis and repair procedures.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-504 Automotive Brake Systems

4 credits—Instruction in the theory and operating principles of drum, disc, hydraulic, and anti-lock brake systems. Laboratory procedures for inspecting, testing, diagnosing, repairing, and/or replacing conventional, power brake system components.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-537 Automotive Advanced Brake Systems

4 credits—This course explains antilock brake systems. It also covers the diagnosis and repair of this system, as well as traction and stability control.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AUT-504.

AUT-610 Automotive Electrical I

4 credits—This introductory course covers basic electronic theory and utilization of electrical measuring instruments. Emphasis will be placed on the application of Ohm's Law and the proper utilization of electronic test equipment including practice with equipment and circuits.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-631 Automotive Electronics

4 credits—This course includes the theory of automotive electronics, communication of automotive electronics and repair of electronic systems.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AUT-610 and AUT-643.

AUT-643 Auto Starting, Charging, and Electrical

4 credits—This course includes automotive electrical theory, electrical components, component operation, testing and repair procedures for automotive charging, starting and electrical systems.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AUT-610.

AUT-704 Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning

4 credits—This course will provide instruction in the theory of operation of auto air conditioning and heating systems. Students will learn how to diagnose and service auto air conditioning systems and heating systems.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-827 Automotive Ignition Systems

4 credits—Operation, diagnosis, and repair procedures used to service the modern automotive ignition system.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AUT-842.

AUT-834 Automotive Fuel Systems

4 credits—This course will provide the instruction to introduce the student to basic fuel system principles. Students will study theory and will gain hands-on experience by cleaning, repairing, and adjusting automotive fuel systems.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-842 Automotive Computerized Engine Controls

4 credits—This course builds upon the knowledge and skills learned in previous automotive courses to prepare the student to service On-Board Diagnosis 2 computer-controlled vehicles. The theory and operating principles of automotive computers, sensors and control devices will be emphasized. Lab instruction on late model cars will be included.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

AUT-886 Comprehensive Application

4 credits—Students are presented with diagnostic problems and repair projects. Competencies attained in prior classes are emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in AUT-106, AUT-109, AUT-164, AUT-610I, AUT-504, AUT-643l, and AUT-307.

BCA: Business Computer Application

BCA-087 College Prep Computer Skills

3 credits—This non-transfer course is designed to assist students who have limited experience with a personal computer. Skills emphasized will include keyboarding, file management, Internet navigation, email, and entry level functions of word processing and presentation software. Students may use this course to prepare for other computer applications courses.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

BCA-132 Electronic Communications

3 credits—An introductory course in electronic communications designed to provide the students with a basic understanding of electronic mail, presentation software, and desktop publishing software. Students will be given hands-on experience with the software.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): CSC-110 or ADM-105 and BCA-134.

BCA-134 Word Processing

3 credits—This course will provide word processing concepts, terminology, and experience producing entry-level and advanced documents found in typical business offices. The major focus of the course is on mastery of word processing functions and concepts.

Lecture Hours: 48

Co-requisite(s): ADM-105 Introduction to Keyboarding.

BCA-183 Basic Web Design Software

2 credits—This course will show students how to use a web authoring software to enhance and manage professional quality web sites. Students will create a web site containing multimedia elements, publish it, and maintain it.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): WDV-102.

BCA-191 Computer Applications

2 credits—This course presents the application of the personal computer as a productivity tool. Basic functions of computer hardware and software and their interaction are introduced. Various components of a computer system are included with hands-on emphasis of the manipulation of word processing, spreadsheet, and database software.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

BCA-201 Introduction to Information Systems

3 credits—The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a firm understanding of management information systems. Included are an introduction to hardware and data communication technology, software and data management, and business applications of the technology. The course will present the basics of information system design and management, and provide opportunities to experience working with an electronic spreadsheet, data base management system and programming using HTML.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): Basic computer, software and keyboarding skills are required.

BCA-205 Database/Spreadsheets

3 credits—This course emphasizes file management and learning to generate and format spreadsheets and databases. File management tasks include managing folders and moving, copying and deleting files. Spreadsheet tasks include making entries, correcting entries, entering formulas and creating charts. Database tasks include designing and creating tables, generating queries, creating forms and reports, and database maintenance. Basic computer literacy is expected of students enrolling in this course.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in RDG-039 and appropriate math placement score.

Co-requisite(s): Ability to type 15 net WPM on a five-minute timing. Test will be given on the first day of class.

BCA-213 Intermediate Computer Business Applications

3 credits—This course covers advanced computer applications including word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software. Topics include using mail merge, desktop publishing, using database functions in a spreadsheet, templates, creating customized reports and forms in database, advanced features of presentation software, importing and exporting data.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in BCA-205, BCA-201, and BCA-134.

BCA-232 Multimedia for Web Design

3 credits—This course is designed to show students the tools and methods for using multimedia objects in web development. Media types discussed will include streaming video and audio, animation, inline media and on-line chat. Students will create website that incorporate multimedia elements.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

BCA-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

BIO: Biology

BIO-042 Prep Science for Health Careers

3 credits—This course provides a focused examination of study skills/strategies and a foundation in biology to help students be more successful in health career classes. Students will be introduced to and given the opportunity to practice a variety of skills for academic success. Students will be introduced to major topics relating to health science curriculum: basic math, terminology, chemistry, and cell biology. Selected topics from the body systems will also be introduced.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in MAT-052 and RDG-039.

BIO-105 Introductory Biology

4 credits—This course provides an introduction to living organisms, their diversity, structure and function and how they maintain themselves both during their life cycle and as a species. It is designed to highlight concepts of the biological sciences for the non-biology major.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO-112 General Biology I

4 credits—This lecture and laboratory course is the first of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The course integrates the basic principles of general biology and focuses on their interrelationships. The major themes addressed include levels of organization, cell structure and metabolism, the genetic basis of life, evolution, diversity and ecological relationships. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of these topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO-113 General Biology II

4 credits—This lecture and laboratory course is part of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The major focus of this course is on the diversity of life forms, including microbes, protists, the fungi, plants and animals. The course will include the study of their structure and function, evolutionary patterns, ecological relationships and behavior. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of the lecture concepts.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO-151 Nutrition

3 credits—Principles of Nutrition will introduce students to the science of nutrition. The course will examine individual nutrients; their structure and function in the human body; nutrient composition of food; and selection of food to meet nutrient needs, maintain health and satisfaction. Students will understand and apply present day knowledge of nutrition to dietary patterns and needs of selected individuals and groups. The course is an advanced beginning course in human nutrition designed for students with a science background.

Lecture Hours: 48

BIO-154 Human Biology

3 credits—Human Biology explores human structure and function and the relationship of humans to other living organisms. The course examines the application of basic biological principles to practical human concerns. The course is a one-semester biology course intended for students who do not wish to major in the biological or health sciences.

Lecture Hours: 48

BIO-159 Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology

3 credits—This course provides a basic overview of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. It is designed to provide practical nursing, and other health science students with an understanding of normal body structure and function as a basis for the study of variations from normal health.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in BIO-042.

BIO-163 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology

4 credits—An introduction to the principles of human anatomy and physiology beginning with the cellular/biochemical level of organization and progressing through a comprehensive study of organ systems emphasizing homeostasis. This is a one-term transfer level class designed for students entering allied health fields or biological sciences. (To be applicable to any health career program, successful completion with a grade of "C" or better is required.) Each student must enroll for one laboratory section.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO-168 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

4 credits—The first of a two-semester sequence especially designed for students pursuing careers in allied health fields as well as any student desiring an in-depth undergraduate transfer course. The course focuses on the interdependent relationships between the structure and functions of body systems and the ways these parts interact (homeostasis) to insure the survival of the organism. Major topics addressed include levels of organization, the chemistry of life, support/movement, integration/control, and coordination. Coordinated laboratory exercises focus on anatomical knowledge and physiological functions. To be applicable to any health career program, successful completion of both BIO-168 and BIO-173 with a grade of C or better is required.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO-173 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

4 credits—The second of a two-semester sequence designed for students pursuing careers in allied health fields or wishing an in-depth undergraduate transfer course in the biological sciences. The course focuses on interdependent relationships between the structures and functions of body systems and the way these parts interact (homeostasis) to insure survival of the organism. Major topics addressed include systems associated with circulation, maintenance, elimination and continuity. Coordinated laboratory exercises focus on anatomical knowledge and physiological functions.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in BIO-168.

BIO-185 Microbiology w/Lab

3 credits—This lecture-laboratory course emphasizes a survey of general topics needed by students entering careers in allied health fields as well as any student desiring a background in microbiology. The course covers aspects of microbial function, nutrition and growth, metabolism, energy procurement, medical genetics, genetic engineering, control using physical and chemical agents, host-parasitic relationships as well as beneficial roles of microorganisms. Coordinated laboratory exercises enhance and support the lecture topics.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

BIO-186 Microbiology

4 credits—Morphology, physiology, taxonomy, and relationship of microorganisms to disease. In-depth laboratory study and suitable lecture material with applications to agriculture, industry, and medicine.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO-247 Applications of Biotechnology

3 credits—This lecture-lab course focuses on the laboratory procedures used in biotechnology and their application to agriculture, nursing, police science, and research. Students will learn the procedures and develop proficiency in such techniques as tissue culture, DNA manipulation, extraction, transformation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA fingerprinting. Students will also be introduced to spectroscopy. The course will also provide exposure to new and emerging topics.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in CHM-122 and BIO-105, BIO-112, or BIO-185.

BIO-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

BIO-928 Independent Study

1 credits—This course provides opportunity for a student to focus previous course work and knowledge on a special issue as well as provide for individualized exploration of topics pertinent to the student's projected objectives within any recognized discipline. Faculty consultation is required prior to registration for this course.

Lecture Hours: 16

BUS: Business

BUS-102 Introduction to Business

3 credits—An introductory survey course which provides an overview of the major functions in business with relation to current social, economic, global, and environmental concerns.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS-108 Business College Experience

1 credits—This course is designed to orient technical business students to the college campus, business and general resources, college services, and expectations. This course will provide an introduction to career portfolios and certifications

Lecture Hours: 16

BUS-180 Business Ethics

3 credits—This course is an introduction to ethical decision making in business. There is an examination of individual, organizational, and macrolevel issues in business ethics. This course does not determine correct ethical action; it is designed to assist the potential businessperson to make more informed ethical decisions on a daily basis. Dilemmas, real life situations and cases provide an opportunity for you to use concepts in the assignments and to resolve ethical issues. Since there is no universal agreement on the correct ethical business norms, critical thinking and informed decision making are emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS-183 Business Law

3 credits—An introduction to the principles of law as they relate to business. This course includes an overview of our court system, sources of law, ethics and social responsibility, contracts, warranties, real property, landlord and tenant, negotiable instruments, and agency. Emphasis is placed on exploring the law as it affects businesses and individuals.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS-210 Business Statistics

3 credits—Application and interpretation of probability and statistics as they relate to business problems; design of experiment, descriptive statistics, sampling, estimation, correlation, linear regression, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variances.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): MAT-156.

BUS-220 Introduction to International Business

3 credits—This course focuses on marketing management problems, techniques, and strategies needed within the world marketplace. Understanding a country's cultural and environmental impact is emphasized. Worldwide consumerism, economic and social development, the spread of multinational corporations, business ethics, cultural diversity, and current economic and marketing issues will be examined.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS-230 Quantitative Methods for Business Decision Making

3 credits—Quantitative and qualitative aspects of problem solving and decision making in business are covered. Topics include structuring and the basics of decision making, classification theory, functional relationships, marginal analysis, resource allocation, and probability.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): MAT-156.

BUS-291 Employment Portfolio and Career Development

2 credits—Develop employment portfolio including resumes, application letters and forms, and follow-up letters. Set career goals, develop prospective employer lists, explore employment tests, learn interviewing strategies, and discuss job etiquette and professional conduct.

Lecture Hours: 32

BUS-903 Business Field Experience

3 credits—This course provides students with the opportunity to gain practical work experience, while applying skills and techniques learned in their program of study, under the supervision of an employer, manager, or supervisor.

Co-op Hours: 192

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 cumulative GPA

BUS-905 Golf Course Internship

3 credits—Students will intern at golf courses and country clubs throughout the region and state, focusing on internal and external operations of the course/club.

Co-op Hours: 192

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in MGT-222.

BUS-905 Golf Course Internship

1 credits—Students will intern at golf courses and country clubs throughout the region and state, focusing on internal and external operations of the course/club.

Co-op Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in MGT-222.

CAD: Computer Aided Drafting

CAD-119 Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting

3 credits—This course will introduce hands-on computer-aided drafting and design. Basic computer hardware, software and file management will be discussed. Basic two-dimensional engineering CADD drawing creation using Drawing Aids will be covered. Various editing techniques will be examined. CAD drawings will be created, edited and plotted.

For non-majors, student with basic computer proficiency can be enrolled with instructor consent.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of D in CSC-110, EGT-108, EGT-410, or ELT-192.

CAD-200 CAD SoftPlan

3 credits—The CAD SoftPlan course will introduce students to an object based CAD program and the process involved in generating a complete set of residential working drawings. Emphasis will be placed on setting up a drawing, using file management, organizing architectural information, paying attention to detail, converting sketches to CAD, modifying CAD drawings, and applying problem solving skills.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in CON-102.

CAD-208 SoftPlan 2

3 credits—The Softplan 2 Course will introduce students to advanced Softplan skills involved in generating a complete set of residential working drawings. Emphasis will be placed on advance organization of architectural information, attention to detail, modifying CAD drawings, and applying problem-solving skills.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in CAD-200.

CET: Civil Engineering Technology

CET-122 Construction Drawing/Contract

2 credits—The course examines typical building and civil construction plans and introduces the methods of bidding and contracting for building projects.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

CET-133 Construction Methods and Resources

3 credits—Methods of and problems related to construction of highways and buildings are covered. Examination is done of the commonly utilized resources - money, materials, equipment, personnel - and their management. Production and handling costs are discussed. Productivity, construction scheduling and construction safety are also covered briefly.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Pre/Co-requisite(s): MAT-744 or MAT-122.

CET-142 PC Concrete, HMA, and Testing

3 credits—This course covers types, production, and physical properties of asphalt and Portland cements, testing and selection of mineral aggregates and concrete mix designs, laboratory testing procedures of mix evaluation and quality control methods for asphalt and Portland cement concretes.

Instructor consent if not in program major.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

CET-160 Surveying

3 credits—Surveying includes the use of surveying instruments and note-keeping for level circuits, topographic surveys, traversing, and construction surveys. Computations to determine errors, distances, azimuths, bearings, angles, areas, volumes, and topics in photogrammetry are included.

Instructor consent if not in program major.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in MAT-744 or MAT-122.

CET-182 Structural Detailing with CAD

2 credits—Structural Detailing uses mostly computer-aided drafting (CAD) and computer techniques to prepare drawings for highway structures which include structural steel, reinforced concrete and structural timber. Course includes the preparation of bar bend details, reinforcing bar lists, and quantity calculations. Topics from the Department of Transportation Specifications are covered also.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in CAD-119.

CET-213 Route Surveying/Roadway Design

3 credits—Route surveying covers horizontal and vertical curves (circular, parabolic, and spiral), earthwork, and elements of safety and photogrammetric applications. Fieldwork includes surveying for a grading project and drafting the plan and profile, cross-sections, and calculating and balancing earth volumes. Roadway design incorporates the use of a computer-aided roadway design software package and includes topographic mapping, highway design, and plotting project drawings.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): CET-160.

CET-223 Soils, Testing, and Foundations

3 credits—Students study the origin, structure, identification, and engineering classification of soils, moisture-density relationships, standard laboratory testing procedures, compressive and shearing strength of soil and bearing capacity of soils and piling.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): MAT-744 or MAT-122.

CET-233 Fundamentals of GPS and GIS

3 credits—This course will introduce fundamental processes of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) including technical aspects of GPS satellites, differential corrections and hardware. The specific application for mapping and data collection will be discussed and demonstrated. Fundamental processes and applications of Geographic Information Systems(GIS) will also be introduced, including file formats, data base management, spatial analysis and manipulation of data.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): CET-160.

CET-253 Fundamentals of Construction Estimating

3 credits—Students learn the fundamental principles of construction estimating. The course stresses the organization of the estimate, the procedure of estimating costs in different divisions of the project and determining the critical quantities of materials obtained from a set of plans.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CET-256 Land Surveying

3 credits—This course covers topics of the U.S. Public Land Survey System, Iowa laws regarding surveying and the preparation and recording of plats. Fieldwork is required to collect boundary measurements and field astronomy for a North azimuth. Calculations include astronomical bearings, traverse adjustment, area and partition of land. Computer drafting is used in the preparation of the plat.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): CET-160.

CET-262 Environmental Technology

3 credits—Topics covered include hydraulics, hydrology, water quality, water and sewer systems, storm water control, solid and hazardous waste, and air and noise pollution.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): MAT-744 or MAT-122.

CET-285 Structural Steel/Reinforced Concrete Design

3 credits—Structural Steel Design covers the design of beams, columns, bolted and welded connections, base and bearing plates, and tension members. Reinforced Concrete Design covers the strength and behavior of reinforced concrete in the design of such structural members as beams, slabs, walls, columns and footings.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

Prerequisite(s): EGT-243.

CHM: Chemistry

CHM-122 Introduction to General Chemistry

4 credits—An introductory course which assumes a minimal student background in mathematics and chemistry. The course is intended to serve students in allied health programs and any student desiring an application-oriented, less theoretical approach to chemistry. The course introduces students to the practical aspects and basic concepts of chemistry including measurements, dimensional analysis, matter, energy, atoms, elements, the Periodic Chart, nuclear chemistry, chemical bonding, nomenclature, an introduction to organic chemistry, chemical quantities, formulas, gases, chemical calculations, balancing equations, solutions, acids and bases, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium. Coordinated laboratory exercises are intended to emphasize topics covered in the lecture as well as stress basic laboratory techniques. Elementary algebra is required as a prerequisite.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in MAT-063.

CHM-132 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry

4 credits—This lecture-laboratory course is intended primarily to serve undergraduate health-related majors such as nursing and dental hygiene as well as the general studies students seeking an integrated background in organic and biological chemistry. Students will study topics applications from a clinical, human or environmental perspective. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with the lecture topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): CHM-122.

CHM-165 General Chemistry I

4 credits—This lecture and laboratory course is the first of a two-semester sequence designed specifically for students majoring in chemistry, physics, biology, or pre-engineering. It is a mathematically rigorous course that assumes the entering student has a strong background in algebra and finite mathematics. Students will learn specific-content chemical information that will be applied within the context of a variety of chemistry applications. Many of the applications that will be investigated highlight contemporary social and scientific issues. Through participation in course activities, each student should expect to improve her/his knowledge of chemistry and to develop improved qualitative and quantitative problem-solving skills. Hands-on experience with laboratory experiments will allow students to learn proper procedures, to gather meaningful data, and to draw logical and appropriate conclusions based on the laboratory data. Content will include chemical equations, stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry, equilibrium, electronic structure of atoms, periodic trends, molecular bonding and structure, intermolecular forces, and nuclear chemistry.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in MAT-102, MAT-110, or MAT-156. Highly recommended that the prerequisite class be passed with a C- or better in the past 5 years.

CHM-175 General Chemistry II

4 credits—This lecture and laboratory course is the second of a two semester sequence designed specifically for students majoring in chemistry, physics, biology or pre-engineering. Students will have successfully completed General Chemistry I or its' equivalent. The course focuses on chemical equilibria and their applications, thermodynamics, kinetics, modern materials, electrochemistry, properties of solutions, chemistry of the representative main group and transition elements, coordination compounds, basic organic chemistry, biological chemistry, and chemistry of the environment. Specific topics are outlined under the course content. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics where possible, and are intended to augment and support these topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): CHM-165.

CHM-260 Organic Chemistry I

3 credits—Theory and practice of organic chemistry with emphasis on the chemistry of functional groups, structure, bonding, molecular properties, reactivity and nomenclature of alkanes, alkenes, alcohols and ethers, stereochemistry, reaction mechanism, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C- in CHM-165 and CHM-175.

CHM-270 Organic Chemistry II

3 credits—Theory and practice of organic chemistry with emphasis on nomenclature and reactivity of alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, and polyfunctional compounds.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of C- in CHM-260 or equivalent.

CHM-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

CHM-928 Independent Study

1 credits—This course provides opportunity for a student to focus previous course work and knowledge on a special issue as well as provide for individualized exploration of topics pertinent to the student's projected objectives within any recognized discipline. Faculty consultation is required prior to registration for this course.

May be taken for up to 5 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

CIS: Computer Programming

CIS-102 Introduction to Computers

2 credits—This course introduces the basic use of the personal computer. The course includes a study of DOS (disk operating system), Windows, and word processing.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

CIS-121 Introduction to Programming Logic

3 credits—This course will introduce language independent programming logic design techniques. Students will learn techniques such as flow-charting and pseudo-code to build complete programs that can be translated into modern programming languages. Students will learn to use elements of decision making, looping, control breaks, and arrays. Language independent Object Oriented Programming will be introduced along with other advanced topics.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CIS-206 Web Scripting

3 credits—This course is designed to give students experience in creating dynamic web sites. Students will use JavaScript to add interactivity to web site. Students will explore the Document Object Model as well as advanced techniques.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D in CIS-231 and CIS-215.

CIS-215 Server Side Web Programming

3 credits—This course is designed to give the student the tools and the knowledge to program using the web programming language ASP.NET as a server side language. This course goes over the syntax and usage of the language. This course will introduce the basics of web applications.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D in WDV-102, WDV-105, and CIS-121.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of D in MAT-110.

CIS-217 Data Driven Web Page

3 credits—This course is designed to give the student the tools and the knowledge to program a web application using PHP and MySQL. This course covers advanced topics such as administration pages for the web site for the management of the web application. This course is a continuation of CIS-231 PHP Programming.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D in CIS-215.

CIS-225 Advanced Server Side Web Programming

3 credits—This course will build on the skills learned from Server Side Web Programming. This course will work with advanced topics in Active Server Pages. Students will be expected to create entire web sites using information learned in this course. A practical hands-on approach will be utilized.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D in CIS-215.

CIS-231 PHP Programming

3 credits—This course is designed to give the student the tools and the knowledge to program using the web programming language PHP as a server side language. This course goes over the syntax and usage of the language. This course will introduce the basics of web applications.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D in WDV-102, WDV-105, and CIS-121.

Pre/Co-requisite(s): A minimum grade of D in MAT-110.

CIS-234 Web Site Administration

3 credits—This course is designed to introduce students to the various platforms that support the servicing web sites. Students will understand HTTP, FTP and SMTP and configure the services. Students will also host and maintain several websites on a server.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): WDV-102.

CIS-249 Web Languages

3 credits—This course is designed to give the student an exploration of other web languages used on the web, and learn the basics of those languages.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D in CIS-215 and CIS-231.

CIS-274 E-Commerce Design

3 credits—This course will introduce students to using the Internet as a medium for marketing, sales and support of a product. Students will learn how to adapt a traditional business model to an electronic model.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): CIS-206.

CIS-303 Introduction to Database

3 credits—This course will introduce students to data management using databases. Focus will be given to database models, data storage concepts, SQL and data warehousing.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CIS-355 Database Design and Management

4 credits—This course will introduce students to data management using databases. this includes database design, normalization/optimization, relationships, security, and database management systems.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

CIS-604 Visual Basic

3 credits—This class will introduce students to creating programs using the Visual Basic language. Students will gain experience in creating applications automating processes using Visual Basic.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CIS-750 Project Management

3 credits—This course is designed to provide students exposure to project management and its importance to improving success in information technology projects. Topics addressed in the course will include triple constraints of project management, project life cycle, cost estimates, value management and motivation theory, and team building. Tools and techniques important to project management will also be presented, including project selection methods, work breakdowns, network diagrams, critical path analysis, and scheduling. Students will have the opportunity to utilize software to help plan and manage an information technology project.

Lecture Hours: 48

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in NET-313 and a minimum grade of D in NET-213.

CLS: Cultural Studies

CLS-130 African Cultures

3 credits—This course will explore the development of Sub-Saharan African civilizations from the dawn of humanity to the issues facing the continent today. The first part of the course will look at the indigenous and colonial heritage of Africa. The second part will examine the political, economic, social, religious, environmental, and gender issues and realities facing the African today. The third part will expose students to significant African contributions and trends in prose, poetry, drama, art, music and dance.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS-141 Middle Eastern History and Culture

3 credits—This interdisciplinary course will examine the history of the Middle East with particular emphasis on the period since the birth of Islam. The course will also explore the cross-cultural exchanges that ancient Middle Eastern and Islamic civilizations have engaged in with other world civilizations. Among the topics covered in this course are the foundation and development of Islam, the cultural influence and spread of Islamic civilization, the creation and politics of modern nation-states, and emergence of Islamist politics.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS-150 Latin American History and Culture

3 credits—This course will explore the development of Latin American civilization form its ancient origins to the issues facing the region today. The course will look at the indigenous and colonial heritage of the area; examine its shared cultural, literary, economic, social, and political contributions and trends; and look at the history and current issues facing the individual countries or sub-regional groupings.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS-160 East Asian Cultures

3 credits—East Asian Cultures is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the emergence of East Asian civilization, its development and diversification, and its contacts and exchanges with other world civilizations. Primary emphasis is on China. The course will explore the various historical, cultural, religious, philosophical, economic, political, social, demographic and geographic factors that make this such a diverse and dynamic civilization and will also draw comparisons between China and neighboring countries.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS-164 Japanese History and Culture

3 credits—Japanese History and Culture is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the emergence of Japanese civilization, its development, diversification, and its contacts and exchanges with other world civilizations. The course will explore the various historical, cultural, religious, artistic, philosophical, economic, political, social, cultural, demographic, and geographic factors that make Japan such a diverse and dynamic civilization. Emphasis will be placed upon attempting to understand Japanese culture as being both unique and as intimately related to other cultures.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS-172 Russian Civilization

3 credits—Russia's turbulent past and uncertain present will be discussed in this interdisciplinary course. It will examine the major political, economic, geographic, social, cultural, religious, and other factors that have contributed to the development of Russian civilization. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding Russia as both a unique Eurasian civilization and a part of the global community of nations.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS-924 Honors Project

1 credits—This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

May be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

CLS-928 Independent Study

1 credits—This course provides opportunity for a student to focus previous course work and knowledge on a special issue as well as provide for individualized exploration of topics germane to the student's projected objectives within any recognized discipline. Faculty consultation is required prior to registration for this course.

May be taken for up to 5 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

CNS: Conservation Technology

CNS-104 Outdoor Recreation II

1 credits—This course provides an introduction into basic outdoor recreation certifications. The course will provide a way for students to learn about boating safety, first aid, and CPR and gain certification necessary for employment. The course will provide background in the principles of Leave No Trace which are essential for wilderness camping. Additionally, the course will provide an examination of the Fish Iowa curriculum for students to share with others as they progress in their careers.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in RDG-038.

CNS-107 Outdoor Recreation Techniques

1 credits—This course provides an introduction into basic outdoor recreation techniques commonly utilized by naturalists and conservation professionals to help citizens gain an appreciation of their environment. Recreational techniques will include activities such as canoeing, kayaking, hiking, and backpacking.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

CNS-108 Wildlife Identification

3 credits—This course will provide information to assist in the identification of common wildlife of Iowa. Wildlife will be identified not only by physical characteristics, but by many other characteristics. Vertebrates, insects, and macroinvertebrates will be covered. Major groups of vertebrates including mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians will be studied.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CNS-109 Wildlife Ecology

3 credits—This course focuses on the application of wildlife ecology and management techniques. It studies censuring, capture and marking of wildlife. The course includes habitat evaluation, habitat restoration, Iowa game laws, life history studies and the application of wildlife management principles as they relate to important ecological and recreational resources.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in CNS-121.

CNS-110 Equipment Operation and Safety

2 credits—Equipment Operation and Safety focuses on the operation, maintenance, personal protective equipment, and safety of equipment used in the natural resources field. Labs include the use of equipment ranging from small engines to equipment used for prairie restoration, timber stand improvement, aquatic management, and park management.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

CNS-121 Environmental Conservation

3 credits—Environmental Conservation is a course that enables students to learn about their environment. Students study about natural ecosystems, interactions within ecosystems, ecological principles and their application, the impact our increasing population has on the environment, the importance and components of a sustainable agriculture, and the environmental issues facing today's world.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CNS-134 Wildlife Management

4 credits—This course will provide a foundation in the dynamics of wildlife conservation and management. This course relates the biological concepts of wildlife populations, habitat management, management goals and applications geared toward various forms of wildlife.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of D- in CNS-121.

Co-requisite(s): CNS-106.

CNS-136 Aquatic Management

3 credits—This course introduces aquatic conservation and management. Bas