High School Completion and Language Learning Programs

High School Level Courses

Hawkeye offers high school level courses that may be transferred back to your high school for credit or be applied toward a Hawkeye Adult High School Diploma. These independent study courses allow you to schedule and take courses at a pace that is convenient for you.

These courses may also be taken to help you develop your math and reading skills for admission to Hawkeye.

Course Length

Each course takes approximately 60-75 hours to complete.

Courses taken to be transferred to a high school or for the Adult High School diploma must be completed in four months.

Courses taken for general interest or as a pre-college requirement must be completed in six months.

Courses for Transfer to Your High School

To transfer a course to your high school, you must:

  • Be referred by your high school counselor.
  • Be at least 16 years of age or older or a second semester high school sophomore.
  • Complete the Adult High School Course Permission form [pdf] and have it signed by an official at your high school.

Your high school will determine the number of Hawkeye courses that can be applied toward your diploma and the amount of high school credits you will receive.

To register for courses, contact your high school counselor.

Adult High School Diploma

To earn a Hawkeye Adult High School Diploma, you must have your high school transcript evaluated to determine the number of credits needed.

If you are 18 years of age or younger, you must complete the Adult High School Diploma Permission form [pdf] and have it signed by an official at your high school.

Upon completion of needed credits, you will be awarded a Hawkeye Adult High School Diploma.

To register for courses, contact the Learning Center.

Cost

High School Courses - $100
These high school courses transfer to your high school or are applied toward a Hawkeye Adult High School diploma.

High School Correspondence Courses - $120
These courses are only available to students outside the Metro area. You must pay an additional $40 refundable book deposit. Not all courses are available for correspondence study.

Pre-College Courses - $100
Brush up and review courses designed to qualify you for entry into a college program.

Courses Offered

We offer courses in the subjects of

English Courses
American Literature Survey of classical, traditional, and modern selections of literature by famous twentieth-century American authors. The students read stories, plays, sections of novels, prose, and poetry. In addition, the students complete vocabulary exercises, apply literary terms, read about authors, and complete extension-writing exercises.
American Literature/ Composition Students read and analyze three novels chosen from a list that includes both classic and modern literature. Study guides are provided to aid the students in their reading and understanding of the books. A writing packet designed to aid in the organization and writing of a personal reaction paper of each book will also be provided. Students will be evaluated on this personal reaction paper as well as an objective test taken after reading each book. (Basic Composition or Creative Writing is a prerequisite of this course.)
Basic Composition Students will write a variety of sentences and paragraphs and a research paper. In addition, they will review punctuation, grammar, and spelling.
English 9

Semester 1 - After completing a review of grammar and usage principles, students are guided in writing short exercises, paragraph development, descriptive narratives, expository composition and journal entries.

Semester 2 - Students will learn to identify the characteristics of various types of literature. In addition, they will analyze short stories, poetry, and drama. Emphasis is placed on analyzing plot, characters, setting, point of view, theme, and tone. Students will also build vocabulary, spelling, and dictionary skills.
English 10

Semester 1 - Students will complete expository and process essays, descriptive and narrative personal writing, and business writing. In addition, paragraph writing using chronological order, comparison/contrast, and spatial patterns will be studied. Special emphasis is placed on sentence combining practice.

Semester 2 - Students will read, study, and analyze short stories, plays, poems, non-fiction, and a novel. Selections from American and world authors are included. Emphasis is placed on literary terms and vocabulary.

Individualized Reading Students will read novels from eight different fiction and non-fiction categories and will learn about specific characteristics that all novels share. They will also learn about the characteristics of certain kinds of non-fiction writing. In addition to reading, students will be required to keep a journal, complete vocabulary exercises, and write book reports.
Literature Lab Students select six novels from a list that includes both classic and modern literature. Study guides are provided to aid the students in their reading and understanding of the books. After reading each novel, students complete both an objective test and a book report.
Reading Improvement Designed to improve a student’s reading ability. Students will complete exercises to improve comprehension, vocabulary, and speed.
Study Skills Students will learn to improve their study habits. Areas of study include time management, environment, reading strategies, memorization techniques, note-taking skills, and test-taking skills.
Math
Algebra

Semester 1 - Students will study signed whole numbers, order of operations, variable expressions, and equations. They will learn to solve equations, write equations, and graph linear equations.

Semester 2 - Students will be introduced to inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, data analysis, exponents and functions, polynomials and factoring. They will also learn to simplify radicals, use the Pythagorean Theorem, and to solve rational expressions. (Prerequisite: Algebra I, Semester 1 or the equivalent)

Consumer Math

Semester 1 - focuses on consumer applications of mathematics. It includes problem-solving strategies and alternate methods of computation as well. Basic skills support is provided as needed. Topics covered include: earning money, net pay, personal banking, budgeting, making purchases, and buying food, clothing, and a car.

Semester 2 - Focuses on consumer applications of mathematics. It includes problem-solving strategies and alternate methods of computation as well. Basic skills support is provided as needed. Topics covered include: public transportation, renting an apartment, buying a house, paying taxes, making investments, buying insurance, using leisure time, and probability and statistics.

General Math

Semester 1 - Students study whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, and percents. Problem solving is presented throughout the entire text.

Semester 2 - Intended for students who have not studied algebra and is also appropriate for those needing a review. This course includes: 1) averages, exponents, and square roots, 2) measures, and 3) introduction to algebra. Algebra topics covered include integers, the distribution laws, equations, positive and negative numbers, and positive and negative exponents. This course assumes knowledge of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ration and proportion, and percents.

Geometry

Semester 1 - Students develop proficiency with geometric skills and to apply the understanding of geometric concepts to real-life situations. Topics studied include points, planes, lines, angles, perpendicular and parallel lines, triangles, and right triangles including the Pythagorean Theorem.

Semester 2 - The study of quadrilaterals and polygons, perimeter and area, similarity, circles, surface area and volume, and an introduction to coordinate geometry and right triangle trigonometry. (Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry I, Semester I)

Module Math

Covers the computation of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents. Application skills using word problems are also provided.

This course cannot be taken for high school credit.

Pre-Algebra

Semester 1 - Designed to prepare students for Algebra I. Mathematical functions covered in Semester 1 include: whole number operations, exponents, order of operations, algebraic expressions, integer operations, linear equations, fraction operations, decimal operations, and square roots.

Semester 2 - Designed to prepare students for Algebra I. Mathematical functions covered in Semester 2 include: graphing, averages, medians, modes, ratios, proportions, measurement, percents, and polynomials. Basic geometric principles are also introduced.

Science
Biology

Semester 1 - Focuses on the major life processes. Included is the study of genetics and the change and diversity of populations. Study of monerans, protests, and fungi follows. Then students learn about plants- their various structures, classification and reproduction. Students become aware that all organisms carry out the same life functions and thus, the ways that organisms are adapted to carry out those functions can be appreciated.

Semester 2 - Focuses on vertebrate and invertebrate animals- their classification, characteristics, reproduction and behavior. The systems of the human body are studied. The last part of the course presents the biology of organisms in their environments.

Chemistry

Semester 1 - Students will study chemical symbols and formulas, valence, chemical equations, solubility, acid-based reactions, the metric system, number in exponential form, atomic and molecular weights, and the atomic theory.

Semester 2 - Topics studied include: atomic theory, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, matter and energy, solutions of acids, bases, and salts, and organic compounds. To show students how chemistry relates to the everyday world, students will also study water and water pollution, air pollution, nuclear power, plastics and polymers, agricultural chemistry, biochemistry, pharmaceuticals and drugs, chemistry of home care and personal products, and chemistry and outer space. (Prerequisites: Chemistry, Semester 1 or equivalent and Algebra I)

Earth Science Explores the land, water, and air of earth and outer space and the objects in space.
General Science

Semester 1 - Explores matter, how energy acts with matter, the earth and its internal forces, and earth’s minerals and rocks.

Semester 2 - Explores the Earth’s history, water, atmosphere, weather, and relationship to other objects in outer space. It also investigates living things and ecology.

Personal Health Focuses on a wellness and health promotion perspective and gives the student information and learning experiences for balancing physical, social, and emotional dimensions of health. Topics covered are: basic body function, mental health, family and social health, growth and development, nutrition, fitness, drugs and alcohol, diseases, and consumer health.
Physical Science Explores matter, how it changes, how it can be made into new materials, and how energy acts with matter.
Social Science
African American History African American history reflects the collective struggle of African people for development and then, because of colonization and enslavement, for liberation and reconstruction. This African-centered course covers the study of early African civilization, detailing the powerful ancestral bonds of African Americans, to the present.
American Government Covers United States government beginning with state and local governments and moving to national government and the role of the United States in the global community. Strong emphasis is placed on the structures and functions of American government at the local, state, and national levels. A solid foundation in the basic principles and purposes of American government is built through study of the Constitution of the United States.
Economics Focuses on basic economic systems, American free enterprise, and institutional and governmental structures which impact economic growth. The global issues of international trade, developing countries, and energy and environment as they interrelate with economic concepts are explored. This course includes exercises involving personal case studies and high interest economic readings to reinforce practical application of economic theory to real situations and people.
General Psychology Students study approaches to psychology, cognitive processes, human development, personality, psychological disorders and sociocultural influences. Learning activities include reading, application worksheets, and tests.
Sociology Students study man’s behavior and development in relationship to society as a whole. Areas of study include culture, socialization, groups, marriage and family, stratification, ethnic and racial groups, collective behavior, social change, and social problems.
U.S. History

Semester 1 - Students review American history from the discovery of America through Reconstruction. The course starts with the early migration of Native Americans and covers early exploration and settlement by the Europeans. Other topics include colonial times, revolutionary times, building of the nation and our governmental system, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Dates covered are pre-1600 through 1876.

Semester 2 - Students study American history from Reconstruction to the present. Topics covered include the passing of the old frontier, the industrial revolution, World Wars I and II, the 1920’s, the Depression and reforms, and the growth of the U.S. as a world leader. Dates covered are 1876 to the present.

World Geography

Semester 1 - Covers the five basic themes in geography: location, place, human-environment interaction, movement, and region. Each unit addresses physical and human geography as well as major issues of a specific region of the world. Geographic areas covered are the United States, Canada, Latin America, Europe, and Russia.

Semester 2 - Covers the five basic themes in geography: location, place, human-environment interactions, movement, and region. Each unit addresses physical and human geography as well as major issues of a specific region of the world. Geographic areas covered are Africa, Asia, Oceania, and Antarctica.

World Studies

Semester 1 - Students study early human civilization. Topics include the beginnings of human society in the Fertile Crescent, ancient Egypt, China, and India, Classical Greek and Roman society, and the early civilizations of the Middle East, Africa and the Americas. Geography and anthropology are incorporated into this study of world history.

Semester 2 - Students will study developing and modern human civilization. Topics include the Golden Age in China, Middle-Ages, Renaissance, and Reformation in Europe, European exploration and imperialism, and the political conflicts of the Enlightenment and early 1900’s. The course concludes with an overview of the changes the world has undergone in the past 50 years. Geography and anthropology are incorporated into this study of world history. 

Metro Center

844 West 4th Street
Waterloo, IA 50702
319-234-5745
319-234-5748 (F)

Map and Directions

 

Metro Assessment Center Hours

Monday-Thursday
9:00am-8:00pm