Liberal Arts AA and AS Degrees

Associate of Arts (AA) Degree in Liberal Arts – Course Descriptions

Award: Associate of Arts (AA)

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ACC131 Principles of Accounting I

4 credits – This course is an introduction to basic financial accounting concepts and procedures for service and merchandising businesses. Topics included are the accounting cycle; accounting systems; financial statements; and accounting for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant assets; partnerships and corporations.

Lecture Hours: 64

ACC132 Principles of Accounting II

4 credits – This course continues to address topics in financial accounting that began in ACC131 Principles of Accounting I. Primary emphasis is on managerial accounting and the corporate form of ownership. Topics include accounting for bonds, the statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Managerial accounting topics include job order and process cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, and standard cost systems. Capital investment analysis and activity-based costing are also addressed.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in ACC131 Principles of Accounting I

ART101 Art Appreciation

3 credits – This course is an examination of the value, esthetic pleasures, structure, function, and history of art. The course explores sculpture, painting, film, drawing, printmaking, photography, ceramics, and architecture. Field trips to galleries allow students the opportunity to personally experience significant visual art.

Lecture Hours: 48

ART120 2-D Design

3 credits – This course introduces students to the principles of design on the two-dimensional plane. Students are instructed in conceptual thinking, content and art practices, and exposed to design, color theory, and organizational principals. An introduction to materials and practice through the disciplines of drawing, painting, printmaking, and collage are part of the conceptualization process offered in this curriculum.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART123 3-D Design

3 credits – This course introduces students to the principles of design on the three-dimensional plane. Students are instructed in conceptual thinking, content and art practices, and exposed to the elements of art/design and organizational principles through the utilization of space. An introduction to materials and practice through the disciplines of drawing, designing and drafting are part of the conceptualization process offered in this curriculum. Projects will revolve around paper and card construction, modeling clay, iron wire, and found objects.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART133 Drawing

3 credits – This course is an introduction to basic drawing. Working with still life props: line, form, values, perspective, and composition will be explored using various wet and dry mediums. Concentration will be on accurate visual drawing.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART134 Drawing II

3 credits – This course concentrates on intermediate drawing problems: Gesture, contour, proportions, mapping techniques, and values are studied through the use of props and clothed models. Creative interpretation with various media and approaches are stressed.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART143 Painting

3 credits – This course is an introduction to painting in a variety of media. Color theory, design theory, and media area applied to exercises, studies, and finished paintings. Concentration is on developing skills in handling materials and personal expression through painting.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART144 Painting II

3 credits – This course is an advanced painting course using a variety of media with greater emphasis on self-direction. Concentration is on developing advanced skills in handling materials leading to greater abilities and personal expression through painting.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: ART143 Painting or equivalent or permission of the instructor

ART173 Ceramics

3 credits – A hands-on intensive introduction to clay and glaze materials integrated with a fresh approach to building interesting forms effectively.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART184 Photography

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the basics of photography. The course covers the basic equipment and skills needed to make effective photographic images. Content includes: camera types, lenses, exposure control, films, and other subject areas related to the photographic field.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

ART203 Art History I

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the history of visual art and artists; prehistory through Gothic. All forms of media: painting, sculpture, drawing, architecture, ceramics, metal work, glass, and others are considered in the context of time, society, and the human impulse to create.

Lecture Hours: 48

ART204 Art History II

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the history of visual art and artists; Renaissance to the present. All forms of media: painting, sculpture, drawing, architecture, ceramics, metal work, glass, photography, film, and others are considered in the context of time, society, and the human impulse to create.

Lecture Hours: 48

BCA201 Introduction to Information Systems

3 credits – The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a firm understanding of management information systems. Included are an introduction to hardware and data communication technology, software and data management and business applications of the technology. The course will present the basics of information system design and management, and provide opportunities to experience working with an electronic spreadsheet, database management system, and programming using HTML.

Lecture Hours: 48

Other Requirements: Basic computer, software, and keyboarding skills are required.

BIO105 Introductory Biology

4 credits – This course provides an introduction to living organisms, their diversity, structure and function, and how they maintain themselves both during their life cycle and as a species. It is designed to highlight concepts of the biological sciences for the non-biology major and satisfies the requirement for a life science course for the Associate in Arts or Science degrees. There are three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO112 General Biology I

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is the first of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The course integrates the basic principles of general biology and focuses on their interrelationships. The major themes addressed include levels of organization, cell structure and metabolism, the genetic basis of life, evolution, diversity, and ecological relationships. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of these topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO113 General Biology II

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is part of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The major focus of this course is on the diversity of life forms, including microbes, protists, the fungi, plants, and animals. The course will include the study of their structure and function, evolutionary patterns, ecological relationships and, behavior. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of the lecture concepts.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO151 Nutrition

3 credits – This course will introduce students to the science of nutrition. The course will examine individual nutrients; their structure and function in the human body; nutrient composition of food; and selection of food to meet nutrient needs, maintain health, and satisfaction. Students will understand and apply present day knowledge of nutrition to dietary patterns and needs of selected individuals and groups. The course is an advanced beginning course in human nutrition designed for students with a science background.

Lecture Hours: 48

BIO154 Human Biology

3 credits – This course explores human structure and function and the relationship of humans to other living organisms. The course examines the application of basic biological principles to practical human concerns. The course is a one-semester biology course intended for students who do not wish to major in the biological or health sciences.

Lecture Hours: 48

BIO163 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology

4 credits – This course is an introduction to the principles of human anatomy and physiology beginning with the cellular/biochemical level of organization and progressing through a comprehensive study of organ systems emphasizing homeostasis. This is a one-term transfer level class designed for students entering allied health fields or biological sciences. To be applicable to any health career program, successful completion with a grade of "C" or better is required. Each student must enroll for one laboratory section.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Course Fee: $50.00

BIO168 Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab

4 credits – The first of a two-semester sequence especially designed for students pursuing careers in allied health fields as well as any student desiring an in-depth undergraduate transfer course. The course focuses on the interdependent relationships between the structure and functions of body systems and the ways these parts interact (homeostasis) to insure the survival of the organism. Major topics addressed include levels of organization, the chemistry of life, support/movement, integration/control, and coordination. Coordinated laboratory exercises focus on anatomical knowledge and physiological functions.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: BIO168 Human Anatomy and Physiology I w/lab and BIO173 Human Anatomy and Physiology II w/lab with a grade of C or better

BIO173 Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab

4 credits – The second of a two-semester sequence designed for students pursuing careers in allied health fields or wishing an in-depth undergraduate transfer course in the biological sciences. The course focuses on interdependent relationships between the structures and functions of body systems and the way these parts interact (homeostasis) to insure survival of the organism. Major topics addressed include systems associated with circulation, maintenance, elimination, and continuity. Coordinated laboratory exercises focus on anatomical knowledge and physiological functions.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: BIO168 Human Anatomy and Physiology I w/lab

BIO185 Microbiology with lab

3 credits – This lecture-laboratory course emphasizes a survey of general topics needed by students entering careers in allied health fields as well as any student desiring a background in microbiology. The course covers aspects of microbial function, nutrition and growth, metabolism, energy procurement, medical genetics, genetic engineering, control using physical and chemical agents, host-parasitic relationships as well as beneficial roles of microorganisms. Coordinated laboratory exercises enhance and support the lecture topics.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

BUS102 Introduction to Business

3 credits – An introductory survey course which provides an overview of the major functions in business with relation to current social, economic, and environmental concerns.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS180 Business Ethics

3 credits – This course is an introduction to ethical decision making in business. There is an examination of individual, organizational, and macro level issues in business ethics. This course does not determine correct ethical action; it is designed to assist the potential businessperson to make more informed ethical decisions on a daily basis. Dilemmas, real life situations, and cases provide an opportunity for you to use concepts in the assignments and to resolve ethical issues. Since there is no universal agreement on the correct ethical business norms critical thinking and informed decision making are emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS183 Business Law

3 credits – An introduction to the principles of law as they relate to business. This course includes an overview of our court system, sources of law, ethics and social responsibility, contracts, warranties, real property, landlord and tenant, negotiable instruments, and agency. Emphasis is placed on exploring the law as it affects businesses and individuals.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS210 Business Statistics

3 credits – Application and interpretation of probability and statistics as they relate to business problems; design of experiment, descriptive statistics, sampling, estimation, correlation, linear regression, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variances.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT156 Statistics or equivalent or appropriate placement score

BUS230 Quantitative Methods for Business Decision Making

3 credits – Quantitative and qualitative aspects of problem solving and decision making in business are covered. Topics include structuring and the basics of decision making, classification theory, functional relationships, marginal analysis, resource allocation, and probability.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT156 Statistics

CHM122 Introduction to General Chemistry

4 credits – An introductory course which assumes a minimal student background in mathematics and chemistry. The course is intended to serve students in allied health programs and any student desiring an application-oriented, less theoretical approach to chemistry. The course introduces students to the practical aspects and basic concepts of chemistry including measurements, dimensional analysis, matter, energy, atoms, elements, the Periodic Chart, nuclear chemistry, chemical bonding, nomenclature, an introduction to organic chemistry, chemical quantities, formulas, gases, chemical calculations, balancing equations, solutions, acids and bases, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium. Coordinated laboratory exercises are intended to emphasize topics covered in the lecture as well as stress basic laboratory techniques.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'C' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra OR appropriate placement score.

CHM132 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry

4 credits – This lecture-laboratory course is intended primarily to serve undergraduate health-related majors such as nursing and dental hygiene as well as the general studies students seeking an integrated background in organic and biological chemistry. Students will study topics applications from a clinical, human, or environmental perspective. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with the lecture topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: CHM122 Introduction to General Chemistry

CHM165 General Chemistry I

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is the first of a two-semester sequence designed specifically for students majoring in chemistry, physics, biology, or pre-engineering. It is a mathematically rigorous course that assumes the entering student has a strong background in algebra and finite mathematics. Students will learn concepts specific chemical information that will be applied within the context of a variety of chemistry applications. Many of the applications that will be investigated highlight contemporary social and scientific issues. Through participation in course activities, each student should expect to improve her/his knowledge of chemistry and to develop improved qualitative and quantitative problem-solving skills. Hands-on experience with laboratory experiments will allow students to learn proper procedures, to gather meaningful data, and to draw logical and appropriate conclusions based on the laboratory data. Content will include chemical equations, stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry, equilibrium, electronic structure of atoms, periodic trends, molecular bonding and structure, intermolecular forces, and nuclear chemistry.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'C' in MAT102 Intermediate Algebra Class in the past 5 years.

Other Requirements: High school Chemistry or consent of instructor

CHM175 General Chemistry II

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is the second of a two semester sequence designed specifically for students majoring in chemistry, physics, biology ore pre-engineering. Students will have successfully completed General Chemistry I or it's equivalent. The course focuses on chemical equilibria and their applications, thermodynamics, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry. Specific topics are outlined under the course content. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics where possible and are intended to augment and support these topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: CHM165 General Chemistry I

CLS130 African Cultures

3 credits – This course will explore the development of Sub-Saharan African civilizations from the dawn of humanity to the issues facing the region today. It will look at the indigenous and colonial heritage of the area; examine the political, economic, social, religious, environmental, and gender realities and issues facing the region; and expose students to significant African contributions and trends in prose, poetry, drama, art, music, and dance.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS141 Middle Eastern History and Culture

3 credits – This interdisciplinary course will examine the history of civilization in the Middle East with particular emphasis on the period since the birth of Islam. The course will also explore the cross-cultural exchanges that the ancient Middle Eastern and Islamic civilizations have made with other world civilizations. Among other topics this course will explore the foundation and development of Islam and its growth to imperial power; the spread of Islam and its continuing influence in world affairs; and the principle events that have brought about the current political and economic situations in the Middle East.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS150 Latin American History and Culture

3 credits – This course will explore the development of Latin American civilization form its ancient origins to the issues facing the region today. The course will look at the indigenous and colonial heritage of the area; examine its shared cultural, literary, economic, social, and political contributions and trends; and look at the history and current issues facing the individual countries or sub-regional groupings.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS160 East Asian Cultures

3 credits – This course is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the emergence of East Asian civilization, its development and diversification, and its contacts and exchanges with other world civilizations. Primary emphasis is on China. The course will explore the various historical, cultural, religious, philosophical, economic, political, social, demographic, and geographic factors that make this such a diverse and dynamic civilization and will also draw comparisons between China and neighboring countries.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS164 Japanese History and Culture

3 credits – Japanese History and Culture is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the emergence of Japanese civilization, its development, diversification, and its contacts and exchanges with other world civilizations. The course will explore the various historical, cultural, religious, artistic, philosophical, economic, political, social, cultural, demographic, and geographic factors that make Japan such a diverse and dynamic civilization. Emphasis will be placed upon attempting to understand Japanese culture as being both unique and as intimately related to other cultures.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS172 Russian Civilization

3 credits – Russia's turbulent past and uncertain present will be discussed in this interdisciplinary course. It will examine the major political, economic, geographic, social, cultural, religious, and other factors that have contributed to the development of Russian civilization. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding Russia as both a unique Eurasian civilization and a part of the global community of nations.

Lecture Hours: 48

CNS121 Environmental Conservation

3 credits РThis course enables students to learn about their environment. Students study about natural ecosystems, interactions within ecosystems, ecological principles and their application, the impact our increasing population has on the environment, the importance and components of a sustainable agriculture, and the environmental issues facing today’s world.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

COM140 Introduction to Mass Media

3 credits – This course presents elements of the mass communication process with emphasis on the forms, functions, regulations, and social impact of the various media. This course helps students understand how media influence their lives.

Lecture Hours: 48

COM148 Diversity and the Media

3 credits – This course presents a historical perspective and a current analysis of various minority groups and how media depict these groups. This course helps students understand why and how stereotypical media portrayals have been produced and how the under-representation of diversified images affects their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward others and contributes to multicultural illiteracy.

Lecture Hours: 48

CRJ100 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 credits – This course examines the day-to-day operation of criminal justice in our society. Emphasis is on the inter-relationships of the components of law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and the juvenile justice system.

Lecture Hours: 48

CRJ120 Introduction to Corrections

3 credits – This course will provide an introductory examination of corrections in the United States. The central theme of the course will be to critically analyze corrections as an integral part of the overall criminal justice system in America.

Lecture Hours: 48

CRJ200 Criminology

3 credits – This course explores theories of factors that influence criminal behavior, and analyzes criminal behavior in relationship to other social problems.

Lecture Hours: 48

CRJ201 Juvenile Delinquency

3 credits – This course is an investigation of the social and legal definitions of juvenile delinquency and its causes. It also focuses on the administration of juvenile court, probation and parole, and assessment of present and potential prevention programs.

Lecture Hours: 48

CRJ233 Probation, Parole, Community-Based Corrections

3 credits – This course examines probation and parole practices related to community-based corrections programs throughout the United States. Emphasis is placed on community-based programs for offenders, administration and legal issues of the programs, trends in probation, parole, and related community-based programs.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: CRJ100 Intro to Criminal Justice and CRJ120 Intro to Corrections

CRJ316 Juvenile Justice

3 credits – This course examines the juvenile justice system from a practitioner perspective. It provides operational knowledge of how law enforcement, the courts, and correctional facilities navigate the juvenile offender.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C in CRJ100 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

CRJ317 White Collar Crime

3 credits – This course examines white collar crime as a social and criminal justice problem, the costs to society, explanations for behavior, and investigative techniques.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C in CRJ100 Introduction to Criminal Justice and a minimum grade of C in CRJ237 Criminal and Constitutional Law.

CRJ318 Crime Analysis

3 credits – This course enables the student to use intelligence and analytic data to identify and inform tactical, strategic, and administrative crime analysis functions.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C in CRJ100 Introduction to Criminal Justice

CRJ320 Criminal Justice Ethics

3 credits – An examination of ethical issues in the criminal justice system with an emphasis on reasoning and decision making for professional competence.

Lecture Hours: 48

CSC110 Introduction to Computers

3 credits – An introductory course in electronic information processing and information system management designed to provide the students with a general understanding of computer hardware and software and the facility to use this knowledge in the creation and management of useful information. Students will be given hands-on experience with operating system, word processing, database management, presentation and spreadsheet software. Exposure to and use of the Internet, including security and privacy concerns, is an integral part of the course. Basic computer literacy is expected for students entering this course.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: The ability to enter data using a computer keyboard at a rate of no less than 15 words per minute on a three-minute timing.

A minimum grade of 'C' in RDG039 College Preparatory Reading II or appropriate Compass score.

Other Requirements: The ability to enter data using a computer keyboard at a rate of no less than 15 words per minute on a three-minute timing.

DRA107 Theatrical Arts and Society

3 credits – This course introduces students to a literary appreciation of drama throughout history. Emphasis will be on reading, discussing, and evaluating various plays representative of their era and genre along with discussion of live theatre, film and television performances, and how these kinds of dramatic narratives interrelate with societies of the past and present.

Lecture Hours: 48

DRA110 Introduction to Film

3 credits – This is an introductory course-exploring cinema as art with an overview of film-making techniques. Emphasis is on watching movies and clips selected based on their demonstration of various techniques, artistic excellence, and genre. Narrative, documentary, experimental, and art films, including international films, will be viewed and analyzed.

Lecture Hours: 48

ECN110 Introduction to Economics

3 credits – This is a one-semester survey course covering basic economic issues and applications. The course includes such topics as supply, demand, pricing and production decisions by firms, consumer decision making, national income and output determination, unemployment and inflation, Classical and Keynesian theories, money and banking, and fiscal and monetary policies. International issues will also be discussed. No credit given if credit earned in ECN-120 Principles of Macroeconomics or ECN-130 Principles of Microeconomics.

Lecture Hours: 48

ECN120 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 credits – Principles of supply and demand and the price mechanism will be presented. Descriptions and interactions of the consumer, business, government, and international sectors will be studied as well as their effects on output, employment, and growth in the economy. The course includes a study of the banking system and monetary policy, fiscal policy, economic growth, differing macroeconomic viewpoints, and international issues.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'D-' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate Math placement score.

ECN130 Principles of Microeconomics

3 credits – Principles of supply and demand, elasticity, and pricing will be studied. The course includes such topics as resource allocation of firms, pricing and output decisions in different market structures, and consumer choice theory. International issues and the world economy will be integrated into the course.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'D-' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate Math placement score.

EDU214 Exploring PK-12 Education

2 credits – This course is designed to give students the opportunity to gain insight into the teaching profession and examine what it means to be a PK-12 teacher. Students will critically evaluate teaching as their chosen or possible profession. An overview of the skills and knowledge they will need to be successful professionals will be investigated. Current and future trends in public education will be examined.

Lecture Hours: 32

EDU216 Introduction to Teaching

3 credits – This course is designed to help students become aware of the foundations of teaching, understand the realities of teaching, and gain insight into the process of teaching. It is provided for students who may be undecided about teaching. The course will investigate the tools and information necessary to make a rational and thoughtful choice about pursuing the teaching profession.

Lecture Hours: 48

EDU223 Multicultural Education

3 credits – This course introduces conceptual, theoretical, and philosophical issues in Multicultural Education (MCE). Students learn instructional strategies for making their future multicultural classrooms into effective learning communities that are collaborative, inclusive, developmentally appropriate, and globally oriented.

Lecture Hours: 48

EDU235 Children's Literature

3 credits – This course is designed to present the dynamics of children's literature. It promotes the selection and evaluation of literature for children as well as how to engage young readers in a variety of literary genres. The course will emphasize literature as a key element of the reading curriculum, grades Preschool-8 and beyond. The course will be relevant to those interested in education and literacy.

Lecture Hours: 48

EDU240 Educational Psychology

3 credits – The study of learning as it relates to cognitive, affective, and psychomotor processes; personal, social and moral development; abilities and exceptionality and motivation, measurement and classroom management.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: PSY111 Introduction to Psychology and PSY121 Developmental Psychology

Co-requisites: EDU920 Field Experience

EDU246 Including Diverse Learners

3 credits – Students are introduced to the issues and practices regarding the inclusion of diverse student populations in general education settings. The needs of all students including general education, special education, and gifted will be emphasized. Strategies for adapting curriculum and the classroom will be examined. Support services that are available to teachers and students will be explored.

Lecture Hours: 48

EDU255 Technology in the Classroom

3 credits – This is a basic course in the planning and practical use of technology resources to enhance and extend the learning process in the face to face classroom, hybrid, and online learning. Students will be exposed to various ways of thinking about educational media and its applications in the classroom. The course is designed to provide the student with experiences that will enable them to select, arrange, utilize, and produce a variety of resources to enhance student learning through their creation of a Thematic Unit.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: EDU240 Educational Psychology or EDU235 Children's Literature

EDU901 Academic Service Learning Experience

1 credit – Students in this course develop and/or implement service learning projects to help the college's community including the surrounding local community under the supervision of college faculty and in cooperation with the staff of community organizations and agencies.

Lecture Hours: 32

EDU920 Field Experience

1 credit – This course provides an observation and participation experience to explore duties, roles, and responsibilities of teachers to the school community. This takes place in area schools under the direction and guidance of classroom teachers.

Lecture Hours: 32

ENG105 Composition I

3 credits – This course emphasizes fluency, thesis-driven organization, the use of supporting details, and research techniques. Writing is approached as a recursive process that includes prewriting strategies, drafting, revising, and editing. The course helps students shape writing to serve readers' needs and define a sense of purpose in their writing. It also gives students strategies for reading college-level material.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENG106 Composition II

3 credits – This course aims to review and extend writing principles learned in ENG105 Composition I to analytical, argumentative, and research-based writing. This course emphasizes critical reading, evaluation, and precise and responsible source citation.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: ENG105 Composition I

ENG221 Creative Writing

3 credits – This is a beginning course for students interested in writing poetry and short stories. The course involves discussion of selected texts by accomplished writers (creative and critical work), assignments designed to develop specific skills and techniques, class discussion of student work, and individual conferences. The semester will be roughly divided between the two genres. As a final project, students are expected to write one of the following: 1) A collection of at least six polished poems; 2) A major revision of a substantial short story.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENV115 Environmental Science

3 credits – This natural science course addresses the manner in which we approach our environment today and how it will affect the world we live in tomorrow. This course examines the challenges of developing sustainable energy sources, maintaining the quality of our air, water, and soil, and preserving the remaining biodiversity and habitat. As these challenges are examined, possible solutions will be evaluated.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENV116 Environmental Science Lab

1 credit – This laboratory course provides a hands-on approach to understanding challenges to our environmental health. The course examines population growth, a framework for understanding the extent of habitat loss and degradation and its impact on biodiversity; water quality and treatment; soil quality and management practices; examination of energy consumption and alternatives; and an evaluation of ecosystem interactions.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

FLS151 Elementary Spanish I

5 credits – This course is student-centered introductory instruction in the basic components of the Spanish language. The course will help students develop the skills necessary for the acquisition and perfection of the primary concepts of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the Spanish language. This course is not recommended for students who have completed one year or more of high school Spanish or the equivalent.

Lecture Hours: 80

FLS152 Elementary Spanish II

5 credits – This course provides continued instruction in the basic and necessary linguistic elements of Spanish to enable the learner to communicate verbally and in writing within the limits of the language presented.

Lecture Hours: 80

Pre-requisites: FLS151 Elementary Spanish I, equivalent, or instructor approval

GEO121 World Regional Geography

3 credits – This introductory course builds an understanding of the physical and social aspects of geography by examining the major regions of the world and their connections. This will be accomplished by a geographic regional "tour" of the world examining the basic relationship between the physical environment and the cultural aspects within these regions.

Lecture Hours: 48

GEO131 Physical Geography

3 credits – This course is an introduction to one of the major sub-fields of geography. Physical geography is the study of how and why physical phenomena vary spatially at and near the earth's surface. The course will emphasize describing the spatial distribution of the earth's natural features, patterns of solar energy receipt, atmospheric pressure, winds, and precipitation around the earth. Introductory laboratory exercises complement the lecture.

Lecture Hours: 48

GEO132 Physical Geography Lab

1 credit – This course is an introductory laboratory course to complement GEO-131 Physical Geography. The course explores the concepts, resources, and specialized methods necessary to understand the major elements of Physical Geography.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

HIS117 Western Civilization I: Ancient and Medieval

3 credits – This course traces the development of Western Civilization from prehistory to 1300 C.E., the end of the High Middle Ages. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course explores major political, social, economic, scientific, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing to Western societies. These include the significant events and contributions of early Middle Eastern civilizations, classical and Hellenistic Greece, the Roman Empire, its successors, the rise of the Western Christian church, and Medieval Europe.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS118 Western Civilization II: Early Modern

3 credits – This course surveys the development of Western Civilization covering the end of the High Middle Ages of Europe to the French Revolution. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course will examine the major political, social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing to the emergence of modern Western European Society. This includes the significant events and contributions of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Columbian Exchange, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS119 Western Civilization III: The Modern Period

3 credits – This course will continue exploring the development of Western Civilization covering the period from the French Revolution until the present. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course will examine the major political, social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing toward Western Society. Included are such major developments as the industrial revolution, the French revolution, Romanticism, European colonialism, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, the new European order, and the world of the Twenty-first Century.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS151 U.S. History to 1877

3 credits – This United States history course examines the country's Colonial experience, Revolutionary period, and 19th Century history through Reconstruction. The course includes political, economic, and social history of this period, as well as the development of American thought.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS152 U.S. History Since 1877

3 credits – This United States history course examines the period from the end of reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is placed upon industrialization and its impact, the development of a strong federal government, an aggressive foreign policy, and a growing involvement in an international economy. The course includes political, economic, and social history of this period, as well as the development of American thought.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS201 Iowa History

3 credits – This history course is a survey of social, political, economic, and cultural developments in Iowa from pre-historic times to the present.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS251 U.S. History After 1945

3 credits – This United States history course examines the American experience from the end of World War II to the present. This course will include the political, diplomatic, intellectual, economic, and social history of the period.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'C-' in HIS152 U.S. History Since 1877

HIS257 African-American History

3 credits – This course examines the experiences of African-American society in the United States from origins in Africa to the present.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS277 History of Women in the U.S.

3 credits – This course studies United States history from the perspective of women starting in the colonial period through the present day. The course examines the historical development of women's role in the family, concepts of sexuality, economic and political roles, and intellectual tradition. A comparative analysis of women's roles in other areas of the world is also provided.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'C-' in HIS151 U.S. History to 1877, or HIS152 U.S. History Since 1877, or WST101 Women's Studies

HUM140 Shakespeare: Dramatist, Psychologist, Historian

3 credits – This course will include a study of several plays by William Shakespeare, including two tragedies, two histories, and two comedies. Study of these plays will start with an examination of the historical period, which provides both the context in which the plays were written and the settings within the plays. Focus will then shift to a dramatic analysis of recurring themes, ideas, characterizations, and psychological profiles. It will end with a discussion of the contributions of Shakespeare to Western civilization and humanity as a whole. Also taught as LIT145.

Lecture Hours: 48

LIT101 Introduction to Literature

3 credits – This course studies multiple literary forms and genres. Students will be introduced to literary terminology, analysis and interpretation of literature, and a variety of authors and literary styles. Instruction will emphasize the process of reading to develop and interpret meaning and classroom discussions encouraging students to share interpretations. Students will also respond to literature through informal and formal written assignments that foster skill in analysis and interpretation.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'D-' in RDG040 College Preparatory Reading III AND
A minimum grade of 'D-' in ENG061 College Preparatory Writing II (or appropriate placement scores: COMPASS Reading 82 and COMPASS Writing 65).

LIT133 Minority Voices in U.S. Literature

3 credits – This course will explore the issues and themes developed in the literature written by minority authors, often underrepresented in the traditional literary canon. The course will focus on works by various dispossessed groups, including African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asians, and women. Genre to be read will include short stories, poetry, and novels. Emphasis will be on the ideas and issues shared in common by the various silenced groups and the unique perspective of each. Class activities will build on students' skills in reading, discussing, and writing about literature acquired in Introduction to Literature.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: LIT101 Introduction to Literature

LIT189 Women and Literature

3 credits – This course examines the predominant ways in which women have been portrayed by both male and female writers. It will also focus on the effects these recurring images may have on expectations for real women.

Lecture Hours: 48

LIT949 Special Topics in Literature

1 credit – This course will explore literature focused on a specific theme, genre, or author; introducing the specified topic and seeking to develop appreciation of the selected literature. Selected topics may include but are not limited to: detective fiction, science fiction, short stories, regional writers, or the work of a specific author.

Students may earn 1-3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16-48

MAT102 Intermediate Algebra

4 credits – This course will prepare the student for College Algebra and Trigonometry or other equivalent course work. Topics include properties of real numbers, linear and quadratic equations, graphs of polynomial functions, systems of equations, polynomial and rational expressions, inequalities, integral and rational exponents, radicals, and complex numbers.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in MAT 063 Elementary Algebra or COMPASS Algebra score 42-65.

MAT110 Math for Liberal Arts

3 credits – This is a one semester liberal arts mathematics course that satisfies the minimum general education requirement for math. The course is designed to impart math skills which are helpful in everyday life as well as to expose students to areas of mathematics they may not have seen before. Topics include problem-solving skills, set theory, algebra, consumer mathematics, probability, and statistics. Other topics may be included.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT063 Elementary Algebra or equivalent COMPASS score

MAT122 College Algebra

5 credits – Begins a two semester sequence to prepare students for the calculus sequence. The central theme is the concept of functions, their properties, graphs and applications. Functions studied include polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

Lecture Hours: 80

Pre-requisites: MAT102 Intermediate Algebra or equivalent COMPASS score

MAT128 Precalculus

4 credits – This one-semester pre-calculus course is intended for the student with a solid algebra background who intends to take calculus. It is also beneficial (but not required) for the student to have a background in trigonometry. The course will emphasize functions using an analytical, numerical, and graphical approach. The student will study linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions along with their applications.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: Appropriate Placement Test Scores: ACT Math Score of 25 OR Compass Score of 51-100 in the College Algebra Domain or 31-50 in the Trigonometry Domain.

Other Requirements: Successful completion (C or better) of three years of high school mathematics including two years of algebra and one year of geometry and/or trigonometry, or appropriate mathematics placement score.

MAT134 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry

3 credits – This course is the second course of a two-semester pre-calculus sequence. Topics include trigonometry and applications, vectors, analytic geometry, and polar and parametric equations.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT122 College Algebra

MAT151 Math Reasoning for Teachers I

3 credits – This course explores mathematics as problem solving, communication, connections, and reasoning with regard to tasks involving numeration, relationships, estimation, and number sense of whole and rational numbers, probability and statistics. Activities and models appropriate to elementary school mathematics are used to represent these topics. This course does not count toward the mathematics requirement for the AA or AS degree.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'C' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra or equivalent COMPASS score.

MAT156 Statistics

3 credits – This course is a study of descriptive statistics including graphical representation, central tendency, correlation and regression, intuitive treatment of probability, and inferential statistics including hypothesis testing.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate placement score.

MAT210 Calculus I

4 credits – This course is the first in a calculus sequence. The course covers topics including functions and their graphs, limits, derivatives and applications of differentiation, and integrals.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: MAT134 Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry and three years of high school mathematics including trigonometry

MAT216 Calculus II

4 credits – This course is a continuation of MAT-210 Calculus I. The course covers topics including integration techniques related to surface areas and volumes, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: MAT210 Calculus I or equivalent

MAT219 Calculus III

4 credits – This course is a continuation of MAT-216 Calculus II. The course covers topics including integration and differentiation techniques related to vectors, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector analysis.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: MAT216 Calculus II or equivalent

MGT101 Principles of Management

3 credits – This course is a study of current theory and practice of leading a complex business organization toward the accomplishment of organizational objectives.

Lecture Hours: 48

MIL103 Military Survival Skills

2 credits – This course is designed to impart an understanding of basic military survival skills. Concepts taught are: first aid/CPR, land navigation, shelter building; water and food gathering; fire building; desert, tropical, and arctic survival. Lab includes cross country skiing, snow showing, land navigation course; hands-on training of survival skills. One required survival weekend exercise and one optional weekend field training exercise (FTX).

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 16

MIL110 Leadership and Personal Development

1 credit – Introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership in the military. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. Discussion, 1 hr./wk.

Lecture Hours: 0

MIL115 Foundations of Tactical Leadership

1 credit – Examines the challenges of leading in complex contemporary military operational environments. Dimensions of the cross-cultural challenges of military leadership in a constantly changing world are highlighted and applied to practical leadership tasks and situations. Discussion 2 hrs./wk.

Lecture Hours: 0

MIL120 Innovative Team Leadership

2 credits – Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative military leadership strategies and styles by studying historical case studies and engaging in interactive student exercises. Students practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises. Discussion, 2 hrs./wk.

Lecture Hours: 0

MIL122 Leadership in Changing Environment

2 credits

Lecture Hours: 0

MKT110 Principles of Marketing

3 credits – This course is an overview of the processes, problems, and activities associated with the planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges.

Lecture Hours: 48

MUA120 Applied Piano I

1 credit – Individualized instruction in piano for the beginning, intermediate or advanced student. Requires fourteen 25 minute lessons during the semester. Additional outside practice/preparation is required. May be repeated for credit. No prior musical experience is necessary.

Lecture Hours: 16

Course Fee: $380.00

MUA319 Applied Voice

1 credit – Provides applied lessons and guided instruction in tone production, technique, musicianship, and performance practice. Students advance their skills through weekly lessons and regular practice of fundamental techniques and solo repertory. This course can be taken for up to 2 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

MUS100 Music Appreciation

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the musical arts through listening to and studying the music of various periods. Some sections of the course may be presented by live musicians. Allied arts, including dance, painting, and literature may be used to demonstrate the relatedness of music to the larger scope of human experience.

Lecture Hours: 48

MUS102 Music Fundamentals

3 credits – This course is an introduction to music theory, basic skills, and vocabulary. The course is for non majors with limited background in music fundamentals or as preparation for music major theory courses. Emphasis is placed on notation, key/time signatures, rhythm, and aural training.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

PEA102 Aerobic Fitness I

1 credit – This aerobic course, designed to improve physical fitness levels, starts at the beginner level with students progressing at their own pace. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in various types of cardiovascular exercise, some being set to music. Abdominal and low-back exercises are also emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

PEA117 Bowling I

1 credit – This skill course introduces students to the lifetime activity of bowling. The course will cover basic fundamentals of bowling such as rules and etiquette, approach, ball delivery, strikes, spares, and scoring. Individual, league, and tournament play will also be included.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

Course Fee: $90.00

PEA123 Circuit Training

1 credit – This aerobic course incorporates cross-training techniques allowing for an increased caloric expenditure with simultaneous improvement in muscular strength and endurance and flexibility. Alternating between resistance training, cardiovascular, and flexibility exercises provides the benefits of all three types of activities in one exercise session.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

PEA125 Indoor Cycling

1 credit – This aerobic course introduces students to a low-impact, go at your own pace, cardiovascular workout with no complicated moves to learn. The class is set to music, conducted in a group format, and uses specially built stationary bicycles to improve current health and fitness levels.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

PEA150 Powerwalking

1 credit – Power walking is one of the most convenient forms of exercise. It takes minimal equipment and can be done anywhere. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn a lifelong physical activity. Power walking is also an excellent way to start a fitness program.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

PEA176 Volleyball I

1 credit – This skill course introduces students to the lifetime activity of volleyball. This will be a fundamental course teaching the basics of the game from scoring to the actual playing. This course will also cover volleyball etiquette. The class will play two on two, three on three, and standard volleyball.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

Course Fee: $80.00

PEA187 Weight Training I

1 credit – This skill course introduces the student to basic principles of weight training and the effects of this type of exercise on the body. Personalized programs will be the focus while emphasizing proper lifting techniques and safety issues.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

PEA191 Pilates

1 credit – This skill course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn Pilates principles and mat-based exercises from the beginner level through the intermediate level, finishing with the advanced level. Pilates is a form of exercise that focuses on core stability and strength while simultaneously lengthening and strengthening the muscles without adding bulk.

Lecture Hours: 32

PEA194 Vinyasa Yoga

1 credit – This skill course introduces the fundamentals of Vinyasa Yoga. Vinyasa Yoga focuses on balanced asana (posture) sequences, as well as the connection of the asanas and the breath. There are a host of associated benefits including, but not limited to, increased levels of body awareness, increased strength and flexibility as well as the benefits shown to be associated with relaxation.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

PEA196 Iron Yoga-Pilates Infusion

1 credit – This skills course provides students with an opportunity to contrast and compare yoga and Pilates, and use a host of equipment to compliment both. Emphasis will be placed on muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, physical balance, and mind control.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

PEC110 Coaching Ethics, Techniques and Theory

1 credit – This is one of the four courses required to receive a coaching authorization or endorsement. This course meets the required hours for ethics. By the end of the course participants should be able to explain methodology and responsibilities of a successful coach, apply teaching techniques to sports skills, connect how communication and motivation affect performance, and distinguish appropriate ethical behavior of coaches and students. Taking responsibility for their own learning, participants should be able to plan for an effective and meaningful experience for the athlete that is supported by informed decision-making.

Lecture Hours: 16

PEC115 Athletic Development and Human Growth

1 credit – This is one of the four courses required to receive a coaching authorization or endorsement. This course will connect the participants to the basic concepts of growth and development of students in the 5th through 12th grade who would participate in school sponsored athletics. By the end of this course, participants should be able to explain how and when physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development occurs and how this development affects learning, behavior, and performance. Taking responsibility for their own learning, participants should be able to plan for an effective and meaningful athletic experience for the adolescent that is supported by informed decision-making.

Lecture Hours: 16

PEC123 Anatomy for Coaching

1 credit – This is one of the four courses required to receive a coaching authorization or endorsement. By the end of this course, participants should be able to apply basic physiological concepts to athletics, connect how they affect movement, conditioning, and performance. Taking responsibility for their own learning, participants should be able to plan for an effective and meaningful experience for the athlete that is supported by informed decision-making.

Lecture Hours: 16

PEC127 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

2 credits – This is one of the four courses required to receive a coaching authorization or endorsement. This course will describe the duties and responsibilities in protecting the health of athletes. The course is aimed at recognizing injuries and providing basic care for those injuries as well as techniques to prevent injuries from occurring.

Lecture Hours: 32

PEH111 Personal Wellness

3 credits – This is an introductory level course designed to explore wellness in all dimensions. Students will assess their overall level of wellness, assess current lifestyle choices, and be enabled with strategies that will lead to an improved lifestyle and overall level of wellness.

Lecture Hours: 48

PEH141 First Aid

2 credits – This course will use discussion and application to provide the layperson with the basic skills and knowledge necessary to provide First Aid, CPR, and AED to adult, child, and infant populations. Certification by the American Red Cross will be awarded to those who qualify.

Lecture Hours: 32

Course Fee: $30.00

PEH266 Leadership Techniques for Fitness Programs

3 credits – This course will prepare students to develop and implement an individualized and group approach to exercise leadership in healthy populations. The student will also become proficient in writing, leading, and demonstrating safe and effective methods of exercise by applying the fundamental principles of exercise science.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

PHI101 Introduction to Philosophy

3 credits – This course is an investigation of some of the fundamental problems of human existence--human nature, the nature of reality, how and what we know, the existence of God, ethical behavior, justice, and freedom. This will be undertaken through readings and discussions of major philosophical schools of thought in Western and non-Western traditions.

Lecture Hours: 48

PHI105 Introduction to Ethics

3 credits – This course examines contemporary ethical conflicts and provides a grounding in the language, concepts, and traditions of ethics. This course provides students with the intellectual tools to analyze moral dilemmas in the fields they choose to pursue and participate in as members of society.

Lecture Hours: 48

PHI121 Classical/Medieval Philosophy

3 credits – This course will cover an intellectual history of Western civilization from the pre-Socratic philosophers through Scholasticism. The course will begin by looking at several philosophers preceding Socrates, as well as study Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the impact of Greek philosophy. It will then look at the development of early Christianity through Augustine, the early Medieval period through Thomas Aquinas, and the late medieval period through William of Occam.

Lecture Hours: 48

PHS120 Exploring Physical Science

4 credits – This course introduces the student to the concepts and processes of physics, chemistry, astronomy, and earth science. Students are presented with a general overview of theories that have an impact on their everyday lives.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of D- in a 100 level math course or appropriate placement scores (ACT: 24 or COMPASS Algebra: 66-100), a minimum grade of D- in RDG040 College Preparatory Reading III or appropriate placement scores (COMPASS Reading: 82 or above), and a minimum grade of D- in ENG105 Composition I or COM781 Written Communication in the Workplace.

PHS142 Principles of Astronomy

3 credits – This physical science course explores the mysteries of the universe. Through scientific reason, the course will examine the following: the history of astronomy, the planets, stars, nebulae, galaxies, the creation and fate of the universe and our place in it. This course includes amateur observation techniques.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of D- in a 100 level math course or appropriate placement scores (ACT: 24 or COMPASS Algebra: 66-100), a minimum grade of D- in RDG040 College Preparatory Reading III or appropriate placement scores (COMPASS Reading: 82 or above), and a minimum grade of D- in ENG105 Composition I or COM781 Written Communication in the Workplace.

PHS152 Astronomy

4 credits – A basic course in descriptive astronomy dealing with the development of modern astronomy and with its present-day theories and observations. Topics covered include motions of solar system and deep sky objects, telescopes and other instruments, members of the solar system, nature of the sun, other stars, origin and development of stars and planets, our galaxy, other galaxies, and the organization of the universe.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of D- in a 100 level math course or appropriate placement scores (ACT: 24 or COMPASS Algebra: 66-100), a minimum grade of D- in RDG040 College Preparatory Reading III or appropriate placement scores (COMPASS Reading: 82 or above), and a minimum grade of D- in ENG105 Composition I or COM781 Written Communication in the Workplace.

PHY162 College Physics I

4 credits – This course covers the fundamental concepts, principles and laws of physics and their applications. It covers kinematics, dynamics, force, linear and rotational motion, fluids, sound, temperature, and heat.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in MAT747 Technical Math II, MAT128 Precalculus, or MAT134 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry, or a COMPASS score sufficient to enroll in MAT210.

PHY172 College Physics II

4 credits – This course is the second semester continuation of General Physics I. The course studies the fundamental concepts, principles and laws of physics and their application. It covers electricity and magnetism, light and geometric optics, quantum and nuclear physics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in PHY162 College Physics I.

PHY212 Classical Physics I

5 credits – This course introduces physics using calculus-level mathematics. Designed for students in Engineering, Mathematics, and Physics. The first semester of this sequence covers the topics of vectors, linear and rotational kinematics, statics, dynamics, oscillatory and wave motion, temperature, and heat.

Lecture Hours: 64 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in MAT210 Calculus I .

PHY222 Classical Physics II

5 credits – This course is the second semester continuation of Classical Physics I. This is a calculus-based course that studies the fundamental concepts, principles and laws of physics, and their applications. Topics include: electricity and magnetism, light and geometric optics, quantum and nuclear physics.

Lecture Hours: 64 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in PHY212 Classical Physics I and MAT216 Calculus II.

POL111 American National Government

3 credits – This course is a study of the United States national government, specifically its institutions, the process of governing, the means by which individual citizens and groups influence that process, and the output of that governing process.

Lecture Hours: 48

POL121 International Relations

3 credits – This course is an introduction to international politics. The course will examine the underlying forces that shape and constrain how countries behave in the international system, historical patterns of state behavior, and the prospect of state cooperation and conflict in the future. Analysis of international relations will be done through the examination of historical events, current events, policy evaluation, and scholarly theory.

Lecture Hours: 48

POL125 Comparative Government and Politics

3 credits – This course introduces the study of politics using a comparative structure. It examines the principles and operation of modern political systems. Emphasis is on the processes in a variety of political systems in the world including democratic, socialist, and totalitarian systems.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY111 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits – This course provides an introduction to the study of behavior with emphasis in the areas of learning, cognition, motivation, personality, behavioral disorder, therapy, and social influence. An understanding of the impact of both theoretical perspectives and experimental evidence on the formulation of the science of human behavior is also stressed. Psychological theories and principles are utilized to explain and predict behavior.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY121 Developmental Psychology

3 credits – This course presents a life span, developmental approach to the study of the developing person that identifies the behavioral dynamics of the physical, cognitive, social, and affective domains of development with a view to the impact of family, school, and community.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY241 Abnormal Psychology

3 credits – This course is a survey of the major classifications of psychological disorders. Emphasis will be on theoretical perspectives, descriptions of disorders, and therapeutic approaches.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: PSY111 Introduction to Psychology

PSY251 Social Psychology

3 credits – This course provides an introduction to the study of the interrelationship between the individual and social behavior with emphasis in the areas of social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group behavior, prejudice and discrimination, and interpersonal relationships. Basic psychological and sociological perspectives and research findings will be reviewed to better understand individual and social behavior.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: PSY111 Introduction to Psychology; SOC110 Introduction to Sociology, or instructor consent.

PSY261 Human Sexuality

3 credits – This course explores the biological, psychological, social, cultural, and historical forces that influence human relationships and sexuality. Research and theory are utilized to examine the diversity of human sexual expression.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY262 Psychology of Gender

3 credits – This course explores the meaning of gender. Research and theory in the areas of gender development, gender similarities and differences, and the nature and effects of gender roles and stereotypes is emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: PSY111 Introduction to Psychology

PSY924 Honors Project

1 credit – This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty. Up to 3 credits may be earned for this course.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 16

PSY926 Honors Seminar

3 credits – Honors seminar in a topic selected by faculty member. The topic would change from semester to semester, coming from the faculty member's area of interest and may also include topics from the Phi Theta Kappa national honors topics.

Lecture Hours: 0

REL101 Survey of World Religions

3 credits – This course is an introductory survey of world religions that have had major impact on world culture and civilization: Hinduism, Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and others. It will examine their cultural settings, sacred writings, key doctrines, central rituals, ethical values, and perspectives on gender roles.

Lecture Hours: 48

REL130 Introduction to Religions of the East

3 credits – This course is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the emergence, development, and diversification of the three cultural regions religious traditions. Student participants in this course will explore not only the basic beliefs and practices of these religions but also the ways in which they shape and are shaped by the cultures in which they are embedded. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding these religions as systems of meaning-creation.

Lecture Hours: 48

SDV108 The College Experience

1 credit – This course is designed to orient students to the college campus, resources, services, and expectations. This course also provides a brief overview and practice of study skills and academic strategies.

Lecture Hours: 16

SDV109 College 101

3 credits – This course provides students a thorough orientation to the college campus and resources. The course is designed to introduce students to the college culture while they examine what a "successful" student is. Students will be introduced to a variety of skills for academic success, academic planning, personal development, and study strategies.

Lecture Hours: 48

SDV127 Study Strategies

1 credit – This course provides a focused examination of the strategies and skills needed for students to be successful at the college level. Students will be introduced to and given opportunity for practice of a variety of skills for academic success and study strategies.

Lecture Hours: 16

SDV131 Career Exploration

2 credits – This course is designed to increase students' knowledge of themselves, of theories about careers, and of various resources available to them which will assist them in the career decision making process. Students, at the completion of this course, will be better able to choose academic majors and careers. This course is specifically designed to follow the National Career Development Guidelines.

Lecture Hours: 32

SOC110 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits – This course surveys the basic principles, concepts, and research findings of social life from small groups to societies. The course examines a range of sociological explanations for the various forms of social behaviors and establishes a basis for reflection and further study in the field.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC115 Social Problems

3 credits – This course introduces students to the sociological perspective and related critical thinking skills as a way of examining the cause and effect nature of contemporary social problems. Within this examination, emphasized are (a) the interdependence of social problems, (b) how social inequality is an inherent characteristic of all social problems, and (c) the relationship between definitions of social problems and social policies.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC120 Marriage and Family

3 credits – Marriage and family is studied from a sociological viewpoint. Content areas focus on the history of family, gender roles, power in relationships, and functions of the family and dysfunctions. Statuses such as being single to marriage to parenthood are emphasized as are alternative lifestyles with respect to sexuality and family.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC135 Death and Dying

3 credits – This course provides a basic background on historical and contemporary perspectives on death and dying. Attention is given to current American practices regarding death as well as cross-cultural interpretation. Emphasis is also placed on the special situation of the terminally ill and bereaved.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC160 Introduction to Social Work

3 credits – This course provides basic understanding of how American system of social services and the social work profession combine in order to meet the personal and social needs of persons who have been classified as "at risk" and in need of public assistance. Concepts relevant to social welfare, social change, social support, and structure are examined, including but not limited to legal aspects, systemic and professional goals and values, and various statuses and roles. In addition, various models and theories related to social work and social services will be examined. Lastly, this course includes a volunteer work experience within an agency setting.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC195 Urban Studies

3 credits – This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of urban issues and culture with an emphasis on the growth and development of urban areas. It utilizes a wide range of approaches: historical, political, social, spatial, economic, and cultural to examine the unique qualities and problems of urban life.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'C-' in HIS152 U.S. History Since 1877, or SOC110 Introduction to Sociology, or SOC115 Social Problems, or GEO115 Human Geography, or POL111 American National Government

SOC200 Minority Group Relations

3 credits – This course examines racial and ethnic relations in the United States. Basic sociological concepts will be applied to historical and contemporary experiences of racial and ethnic groups with particular attention paid to minority groups.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC205 Diversity in America

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the sociological study of majority-minority group relations. Focus will be on the basic concepts such as groups, intergroup relations, power, prejudice, and discrimination, as well as social understanding, tolerance, and acceptance. A wide assortment of minority groups, including women, racial, ethnic, the physically and mentally disabled, homosexuals, religious groups, the elderly and the young, and those singled out for their lower socio-economic status will be considered.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC208 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

3 credits – This course introduces the student to a comparative study of societies around the world. In this course cultural similarities and differences are explored to illustrate how human beings construct and conduct their existence. It emphasizes the origin and maintenance of the human species by studying its evolution, cultural development, ecology, kinship, organizations, and symbolic expressions.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC220 Sociology of Aging

3 credits – This introductory gerontology course examines the influence of an aging society, explores the process of aging, old age as a state of life and the impact of aging both personally, and on society as a whole.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC850 Cultural Immersion Field Experience

1 credit – This course combines classroom and community-based learning to expand student understanding of the global society. Living within a diverse community and working with diverse groups of people, students will engage in an authentic and practical cultural immersion experience off-campus. Students can earn 1-3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 48-144

Course Fee: $450.00

SPC101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

3 credits – This course presents elements of the oral communications process with emphasis in developing public speaking skill. Students will be involved in activities that provide opportunity for the understanding and improvement of their oral communication skills.

Lecture Hours: 48

SPC122 Interpersonal Communication

3 credits – This course explores concepts, contexts, and processes of person-to-person communication in relationships. Emphasis is placed on understanding how social worlds are created through conversation.

Lecture Hours: 48

SPC132 Group Communication

3 credits – This course examines the principles of small group communication processes with opportunities for students to apply theory in various structured discussion situations.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: SPC101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

WST101 Women's Studies

3 credits – This course serves as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's studies and to current women's issues in our society. It explores ways in which women get marginalized and silenced primarily by the social definitions and the patriarchal male power structure. The course seeks to help students develop critical thinking relative to contemporary gender issues; to explore their assumptions about gender; to illuminate social constructions of femininity and women's roles; and to uncover the ways in which social teachings shape and limit women's lives.

Lecture Hours: 48

XXX924 Honors Project

1 credit – This course involves in-depth independent research on an approved topic under supervision of a faculty member. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty. Can be taken for up to 3 credits.

Lecture Hours: 16

XXX926 Honors Seminar

3 credits – Honors seminar in a topic selected by faculty member. The topic would change from semester to semester, coming from the faculty member's area of interest and may also include topics from the Phi Theta Kappa national honors topics.

Lecture Hours: 48

Program Contacts

Advisors

Lisa Ciesielski
Student Services
Hawkeye Center
Upper Level
319-296-2329 ext.1727
Email me

Lacy Knipper
Student Services
Hawkeye Center
Upper Level
319-296-2329 ext.1086
Email me

Dean of Math, Natural and Social Sciences

Cynthia Bottrell
Grundy Hall 207
319-296-4470
Email me