Accelerated Courses for Working Adults

Liberal Arts Course Descriptions – Accelerated Courses

Award: Associate of Arts (AA)

VIEW DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ACC131 Principles of Accounting I

4 credits – This course is an introduction to basic financial accounting concepts and procedures for service and merchandising businesses. Topics included are the accounting cycle; accounting systems; financial statements; and accounting for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant assets; partnerships and corporations.

Lecture Hours: 64

ACC132 Principles of Accounting II

4 credits – This course continues to address topics in financial accounting that began in ACC131 Principles of Accounting I. Primary emphasis is on managerial accounting and the corporate form of ownership. Topics include accounting for bonds, the statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Managerial accounting topics include job order and process cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, and standard cost systems. Capital investment analysis and activity-based costing are also addressed.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in ACC131 Principles of Accounting I

BIO154 Human Biology

3 credits – This course explores human structure and function and the relationship of humans to other living organisms. The course examines the application of basic biological principles to practical human concerns. The course is a one-semester biology course intended for students who do not wish to major in the biological or health sciences.

Lecture Hours: 48

BUS183 Business Law

3 credits – An introduction to the principles of law as they relate to business. This course includes an overview of our court system, sources of law, ethics and social responsibility, contracts, warranties, real property, landlord and tenant, negotiable instruments, and agency. Emphasis is placed on exploring the law as it affects businesses and individuals.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS130 African Cultures

3 credits – This course will explore the development of Sub-Saharan African civilizations from the dawn of humanity to the issues facing the region today. It will look at the indigenous and colonial heritage of the area; examine the political, economic, social, religious, environmental, and gender realities and issues facing the region; and expose students to significant African contributions and trends in prose, poetry, drama, art, music, and dance.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS141 Middle Eastern History and Culture

3 credits – This interdisciplinary course will examine the history of civilization in the Middle East with particular emphasis on the period since the birth of Islam. The course will also explore the cross-cultural exchanges that the ancient Middle Eastern and Islamic civilizations have made with other world civilizations. Among other topics this course will explore the foundation and development of Islam and its growth to imperial power; the spread of Islam and its continuing influence in world affairs; and the principle events that have brought about the current political and economic situations in the Middle East.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS150 Latin American History and Culture

3 credits – This course will explore the development of Latin American civilization form its ancient origins to the issues facing the region today. The course will look at the indigenous and colonial heritage of the area; examine its shared cultural, literary, economic, social, and political contributions and trends; and look at the history and current issues facing the individual countries or sub-regional groupings.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS160 East Asian Cultures

3 credits – This course is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the emergence of East Asian civilization, its development and diversification, and its contacts and exchanges with other world civilizations. Primary emphasis is on China. The course will explore the various historical, cultural, religious, philosophical, economic, political, social, demographic, and geographic factors that make this such a diverse and dynamic civilization and will also draw comparisons between China and neighboring countries.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS164 Japanese History and Culture

3 credits – Japanese History and Culture is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the emergence of Japanese civilization, its development, diversification, and its contacts and exchanges with other world civilizations. The course will explore the various historical, cultural, religious, artistic, philosophical, economic, political, social, cultural, demographic, and geographic factors that make Japan such a diverse and dynamic civilization. Emphasis will be placed upon attempting to understand Japanese culture as being both unique and as intimately related to other cultures.

Lecture Hours: 48

CLS172 Russian Civilization

3 credits – Russia's turbulent past and uncertain present will be discussed in this interdisciplinary course. It will examine the major political, economic, geographic, social, cultural, religious, and other factors that have contributed to the development of Russian civilization. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding Russia as both a unique Eurasian civilization and a part of the global community of nations.

Lecture Hours: 48

ECN120 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 credits – Principles of supply and demand and the price mechanism will be presented. Descriptions and interactions of the consumer, business, government, and international sectors will be studied as well as their effects on output, employment, and growth in the economy. The course includes a study of the banking system and monetary policy, fiscal policy, economic growth, differing macroeconomic viewpoints, and international issues.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'D-' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate Math placement score.

ECN130 Principles of Microeconomics

3 credits – Principles of supply and demand, elasticity, and pricing will be studied. The course includes such topics as resource allocation of firms, pricing and output decisions in different market structures, and consumer choice theory. International issues and the world economy will be integrated into the course.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'D-' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate Math placement score.

ENG105 Composition I

3 credits – This course emphasizes fluency, thesis-driven organization, the use of supporting details, and research techniques. Writing is approached as a recursive process that includes prewriting strategies, drafting, revising, and editing. The course helps students shape writing to serve readers' needs and define a sense of purpose in their writing. It also gives students strategies for reading college-level material.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENG106 Composition II

3 credits – This course aims to review and extend writing principles learned in ENG105 Composition I to analytical, argumentative, and research-based writing. This course emphasizes critical reading, evaluation, and precise and responsible source citation.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: ENG105 Composition I

ENV115 Environmental Science

3 credits – This natural science course addresses the manner in which we approach our environment today and how it will affect the world we live in tomorrow. This course examines the challenges of developing sustainable energy sources, maintaining the quality of our air, water, and soil, and preserving the remaining biodiversity and habitat. As these challenges are examined, possible solutions will be evaluated.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS117 Western Civilization I: Ancient and Medieval

3 credits – This course traces the development of Western Civilization from prehistory to 1300 C.E., the end of the High Middle Ages. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course explores major political, social, economic, scientific, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing to Western societies. These include the significant events and contributions of early Middle Eastern civilizations, classical and Hellenistic Greece, the Roman Empire, its successors, the rise of the Western Christian church, and Medieval Europe.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS118 Western Civilization II: Early Modern

3 credits – This course surveys the development of Western Civilization covering the end of the High Middle Ages of Europe to the French Revolution. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course will examine the major political, social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing to the emergence of modern Western European Society. This includes the significant events and contributions of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Columbian Exchange, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS119 Western Civilization III: The Modern Period

3 credits – This course will continue exploring the development of Western Civilization covering the period from the French Revolution until the present. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course will examine the major political, social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing toward Western Society. Included are such major developments as the industrial revolution, the French revolution, Romanticism, European colonialism, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, the new European order, and the world of the Twenty-first Century.

Lecture Hours: 48

MAT156 Statistics

3 credits – This course is a study of descriptive statistics including graphical representation, central tendency, correlation and regression, intuitive treatment of probability, and inferential statistics including hypothesis testing.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate placement score.

MGT101 Principles of Management

3 credits – This course is a study of current theory and practice of leading a complex business organization toward the accomplishment of organizational objectives.

Lecture Hours: 48

MKT110 Principles of Marketing

3 credits – This course is an overview of the processes, problems, and activities associated with the planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges.

Lecture Hours: 48

MUS100 Music Appreciation

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the musical arts through listening to and studying the music of various periods. Some sections of the course may be presented by live musicians. Allied arts, including dance, painting, and literature may be used to demonstrate the relatedness of music to the larger scope of human experience.

Lecture Hours: 48

PHI105 Introduction to Ethics

3 credits – This course examines contemporary ethical conflicts and provides a grounding in the language, concepts, and traditions of ethics. This course provides students with the intellectual tools to analyze moral dilemmas in the fields they choose to pursue and participate in as members of society.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY111 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits – This course provides an introduction to the study of behavior with emphasis in the areas of learning, cognition, motivation, personality, behavioral disorder, therapy, and social influence. An understanding of the impact of both theoretical perspectives and experimental evidence on the formulation of the science of human behavior is also stressed. Psychological theories and principles are utilized to explain and predict behavior.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC110 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits – This course surveys the basic principles, concepts, and research findings of social life from small groups to societies. The course examines a range of sociological explanations for the various forms of social behaviors and establishes a basis for reflection and further study in the field.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC205 Diversity in America

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the sociological study of majority-minority group relations. Focus will be on the basic concepts such as groups, intergroup relations, power, prejudice, and discrimination, as well as social understanding, tolerance, and acceptance. A wide assortment of minority groups, including women, racial, ethnic, the physically and mentally disabled, homosexuals, religious groups, the elderly and the young, and those singled out for their lower socio-economic status will be considered.

Lecture Hours: 48

SPC101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

3 credits – This course presents elements of the oral communications process with emphasis in developing public speaking skill. Students will be involved in activities that provide opportunity for the understanding and improvement of their oral communication skills.

Lecture Hours: 48

 

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