Agricultural Science

Agricultural Science Course Descriptions

Award: Associate of Science (AS)

VIEW SEQUENCE OF STUDY

ACC131 Principles of Accounting I

4 credits – This course is an introduction to basic financial accounting concepts and procedures for service and merchandising businesses. Topics included are the accounting cycle; accounting systems; financial statements; and accounting for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant assets; partnerships and corporations.

Lecture Hours: 64

AGA114 Principles of Agronomy

3 credits – This course presents introductory principles of plant-soil-climate relationships in crop production, plant anatomy, crop plant classification and identification, crop physiology, climate, soils, soil water, tillage and seeding, plant breeding, seed and grain quality, weeds, insects, crop diseases, crop management, harvesting and storage. Global Positioning and Geographic Information Systems in crop systems is discussed.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Course Fee: $44.00

AGA154 Fundamentals of Soil Science

3 credits – This course presents information on soils and soil fertility, land use, soil formation, soil types, soil testing, soil physical characteristics, soil classes, primary nutrients, secondary nutrients, micro-nutrients, fertilizer materials, fertilizing, and using soil test information. The use of Global Positioning and Geographic Information Systems in recording soil data is covered.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGA376 Integrated Pest Management

3 credits – This course is designed to make application and use of some materials learned in other courses. Decision making as it deals with the total cropping plan is stressed. An individual will determine from observation weed problems, plant populations, disease problems, insect problems, and do yield checks to make recommendations for handling any problems.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGB336 Agricultural Selling

3 credits – This course presents aspects of the sales process including: selling success, types of sales questions, creating the selling climate, motivation, attitude, referral prospecting, no referral prospecting, phone sales, sales presentations and demonstrations, qualifying the prospect, overcoming objectiveness, closing twelve power closes, and sales paper work.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGP333 Precision Farming Systems

3 credits – Fundamental processes of Global Positioning System (GPS) with emphasis on its application to agriculture will be covered. General technical aspects of the GPS satellites, differential correction, and hardware will be covered. The specific application of this technology in agriculture for mapping, navigation, variable rate technology (VRT), and data collection will be discussed and demonstrated on the farm laboratory.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGP450 Fundamentals of GIS

3 credits – Fundamental processes of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with emphasis in its application to agriculture will be covered. File formats, database management, spatial analysis, and manipulation of data will be covered thoroughly. Comparisons of GIS and mapping software and conversions between formats will also be discussed. The lab portion will concentrate on using georeferenced data from mapping and yield monitoring to develop maps from which a VRT prescription will be synthesized.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS113 Survey of the Animal Industry

3 credits – This course introduces students to the species and breeds of domestic livestock and development of an appreciation for the principles of livestock production, and issues facing product marketing. Topics include: breeds, basic management, composition, evaluation, and marketing of farm animals and animal products; including beef and dairy cattle, horses, goats, poultry, sheep and swine.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGS211 Issues Facing Animal Science

2 credits – This class is an overview of the factors that define contemporary ethical and scientifically based issues facing animal agriculture. Life skills development will be incorporated.

Lecture Hours: 32

BIO112 General Biology I

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is the first of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The course integrates the basic principles of general biology and focuses on their interrelationships. The major themes addressed include levels of organization, cell structure and metabolism, the genetic basis of life, evolution, diversity, and ecological relationships. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of these topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO113 General Biology II

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is part of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The major focus of this course is on the diversity of life forms, including microbes, protists, the fungi, plants, and animals. The course will include the study of their structure and function, evolutionary patterns, ecological relationships and, behavior. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of the lecture concepts.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

CHM165 General Chemistry I

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is the first of a two-semester sequence designed specifically for students majoring in chemistry, physics, biology, or pre-engineering. It is a mathematically rigorous course that assumes the entering student has a strong background in algebra and finite mathematics. Students will learn concepts specific chemical information that will be applied within the context of a variety of chemistry applications. Many of the applications that will be investigated highlight contemporary social and scientific issues. Through participation in course activities, each student should expect to improve her/his knowledge of chemistry and to develop improved qualitative and quantitative problem-solving skills. Hands-on experience with laboratory experiments will allow students to learn proper procedures, to gather meaningful data, and to draw logical and appropriate conclusions based on the laboratory data. Content will include chemical equations, stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry, equilibrium, electronic structure of atoms, periodic trends, molecular bonding and structure, intermolecular forces, and nuclear chemistry.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'C' in MAT102 Intermediate Algebra Class in the past 5 years.

Other Requirements: High school Chemistry or consent of instructor

ENG105 Composition I

3 credits – This course emphasizes fluency, thesis-driven organization, the use of supporting details, and research techniques. Writing is approached as a recursive process that includes prewriting strategies, drafting, revising, and editing. The course helps students shape writing to serve readers' needs and define a sense of purpose in their writing. It also gives students strategies for reading college-level material.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENG106 Composition II

3 credits – This course aims to review and extend writing principles learned in ENG105 Composition I to analytical, argumentative, and research-based writing. This course emphasizes critical reading, evaluation, and precise and responsible source citation.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: ENG105 Composition I

HIS117 Western Civilization I: Ancient and Medieval

3 credits – This course traces the development of Western Civilization from prehistory to 1300 C.E., the end of the High Middle Ages. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course explores major political, social, economic, scientific, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing to Western societies. These include the significant events and contributions of early Middle Eastern civilizations, classical and Hellenistic Greece, the Roman Empire, its successors, the rise of the Western Christian church, and Medieval Europe.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS151 U.S. History to 1877

3 credits – This United States history course examines the country's Colonial experience, Revolutionary period, and 19th Century history through Reconstruction. The course includes political, economic, and social history of this period, as well as the development of American thought.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS152 U.S. History Since 1877

3 credits – This United States history course examines the period from the end of reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is placed upon industrialization and its impact, the development of a strong federal government, an aggressive foreign policy, and a growing involvement in an international economy. The course includes political, economic, and social history of this period, as well as the development of American thought.

Lecture Hours: 48

MAT156 Statistics

3 credits – This course is a study of descriptive statistics including graphical representation, central tendency, correlation and regression, intuitive treatment of probability, and inferential statistics including hypothesis testing.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate placement score.

SOC115 Social Problems

3 credits – This course introduces students to the sociological perspective and related critical thinking skills as a way of examining the cause and effect nature of contemporary social problems. Within this examination, emphasized are (a) the interdependence of social problems, (b) how social inequality is an inherent characteristic of all social problems, and (c) the relationship between definitions of social problems and social policies.

Lecture Hours: 48

SPC101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

3 credits – This course presents elements of the oral communications process with emphasis in developing public speaking skill. Students will be involved in activities that provide opportunity for the understanding and improvement of their oral communication skills.

Lecture Hours: 48

 

Program Contacts

Department Secretary

Dianne Lellig
Butler Hall 104
319-296-4011
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Program Advisor

Dave Grunklee
Bremer Hall 101-D
319-296-2329 ext.1115
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Dean

Ray Beets
Butler Hall 104-A
319-296-4042
Email me