Natural Resources Management

Natural Resources Management Course Descriptions

Award: Associate of Applied Science (AAS)

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AGA154 Fundamentals of Soil Science

3 credits – This course presents information on soils and soil fertility, land use, soil formation, soil types, soil testing, soil physical characteristics, soil classes, primary nutrients, secondary nutrients, micro-nutrients, fertilizer materials, fertilizing, and using soil test information. The use of Global Positioning and Geographic Information Systems in recording soil data is covered.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGA284 Pesticide Application Certification

3 credits – This course will introduce students to the safe use of agricultural chemicals. Safety precautions and prevention of chemical exposure will be stressed when discussing types of chemicals, usage, application, equipment, and mixing. First aid and responding to chemical contamination will also be discussed. This course prepares the students for taking the Iowa Commercial Pesticide Applicators Certification Exam.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Course Fee: $46.00

AGC103 Ag Computer

3 credits – This course will introduce students to the hardware, software, word processing, database and spreadsheet programs, as well as various utility software. Applications of various agricultural management uses are covered throughout. Networks, telecommunication, Global Positioning, and Geographic Information Systems are also introduced.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

AGH140 Equipment Operations

2 credits – This course introduces the general care and use of horticultural equipment in turf and landscape maintenance and construction. Emphasis is on operation, preventative maintenance performed by the operator, daily lubrications, and minor adjustments. Students will also mount and dismount accessories used on the equipment. Safe operation of machinery is emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 32

AGP340 Foundations of GIS and GPS

3 credits – This course will introduce fundamental processes of Global Positioning System (GPS) including technical aspects of the GPS satellites, differential correction, and hardware. The specific application of this technology for mapping, navigation, variable rate technology (VRT), and data collection will be discussed and demonstrated. Fundamental processes of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will also be introduced, including file formats, data base management, spatial analysis, and manipulation of data.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Course Fee: $31.00

AGT805 Employment Experience

5 credits – This course provides students with opportunities to gain on-the-job experience in the agriculture industry. Students will gain an understanding of qualities and skills needed for success in the agricultural field. Coordination and guidance will be provided by department instructors.

Lecture Hours: 0 Co-op Hours: 320

BIO112 General Biology I

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is the first of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The course integrates the basic principles of general biology and focuses on their interrelationships. The major themes addressed include levels of organization, cell structure and metabolism, the genetic basis of life, evolution, diversity, and ecological relationships. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of these topics.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

BIO113 General Biology II

4 credits – This lecture and laboratory course is part of a two semester sequence designed for students with a specific interest in majoring in the biological sciences or a desire for a more comprehensive undergraduate course in the discipline. The major focus of this course is on the diversity of life forms, including microbes, protists, the fungi, plants, and animals. The course will include the study of their structure and function, evolutionary patterns, ecological relationships and, behavior. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics to enhance the student's understanding of the lecture concepts.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

CNS106 Wildlife Ecology

4 credits – This course examines wildlife ecology. Students will be introduced to wildlife management to apply ecological knowledge in ways to find a balance between the needs of wildlife and the needs of people.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: CNS121 Environmental Conservation or equivalent course in ecology.

CNS107 Outdoor Recreation Techniques

1 credit – This course provides an introduction into basic outdoor recreation techniques commonly utilized by naturalists and conservation professionals to help citizens gain an appreciation of their environment. Recreational techniques will include activities such as canoeing, kayaking, hiking, spelunking, cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

Course Fee: $91.00

CNS108 Wildlife Identification

3 credits – This course will provide information to assist in the identification of common wildlife of Iowa. Wildlife will be identified not only by physical characteristics but by many other characteristics. Vertebrates, insects, and macroinvertebrates will be covered. Major groups of vertebrates including mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians will be studied.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CNS121 Environmental Conservation

3 credits – This course enables students to learn about their environment. Students study about natural ecosystems, interactions within ecosystems, ecological principles and their application, the impact our increasing population has on the environment, the importance and components of a sustainable agriculture, and the environmental issues facing today’s world.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CNS134 Wildlife Management

4 credits – This course will provide a foundation in the dynamics of wildlife conservation and management. This course relates the biological concepts of wildlife populations, habitat management, management goals and applications geared toward various forms of wildlife.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: CNS106 Wildlife Ecology

CNS136 Aquatic Management

3 credits – This course introduces aquatic conservation and management. Basic background on aquatic environments, the ecology of fish, and the characteristics of humans who utilize aquatic resources or indirectly interact with them through land- and water-use activities will be covered.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CNS138 Woodland Management

3 credits – This course will provide an introduction to woodland management from an ecological management perspective. Management of small properties will be emphasized.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CNS143 Fire Management

3 credits – This course focuses on prescribed burns as a tool in ecosystem management. The use of fire to meet resource management objectives requires definitive and quantified knowledge of physical, biological, and ecological effects of fire on the ecosystem involved. Students will be trained in conducting prescribed burns and will participate as burn crew members.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: CNS121 Environmental Conservation

Course Fee: $88.00

CNS201 Conservation Biology

4 credits – Conservation Biology has drawn together scientists and environmentalists in basic and applied studies of biodiversity. The student will examine the nature of this emerging field, and will survey basic principles of ecology with emphasis on the ecosystem concept and its central role in conservation management. The student will examine biodiversity in detail, evaluate the threats to biodiversity, and examine the processes of extinction that are leading to a biodiversity crisis. The student will be an active participant in current conservation projects and will conduct studies of the biological diversity of their community.

Lecture Hours: 48 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: CNS121 Environmental Conservation

CNS204 Native Vegetation

3 credits – This course provides an introduction to botany, landforms of Iowa, and native plant communities. Emphasis will be on the identification of native plants and differentiation from exotic weed species.

Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 32

CNS205 Advanced Outdoor Recreation Techniques

1 credit – This course provides a wilderness experience to utilize advanced outdoor recreation techniques during an intense time period (over Labor Day weekend or the equivalent). Techniques utilized include hiking, backpacking, canoeing or kayaking, low impact camping, and others. This wilderness encounter is at a remote location such as the Boundary Waters, Isle Royale, etc. The focus of this experience is to gain leadership skills to guide groups of citizens on basic outdoor recreation adventures to increase their appreciation of their environment such as is done by naturalists and conservation groups by following the 18 points set by the Wilderness Education Association and Leave No Trace Principles.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: CNS107 Outdoor Recreation Techniques

Course Fee: $375.00

CNS228 Natural Areas Management

3 credits – This course provides a background in the restoration of native ecosystems. Restoration practices from site analysis, seed and plant selection, and planting techniques; to management by fire, mowing, and weed control are covered. Students will have practical experiences in the reconstruction and management of various ecosystems.

Lecture Hours: 16 Lab Hours: 64

Course Fee: $59.00

CNS231 Integrated Roadside Vegetation Management

2 credits – This course examines integrated roadside vegetation management (IRVM) as a decision-making process for maintaining roadsides. IRVM includes the needs of local communities and highway users; the knowledge of plant ecology and natural processes; design, construction, and maintenance considerations, monitoring and evaluation procedures, government statutes and regulations, and technology. It integrates these with cultural, biological, mechanical, and chemical methods to economically manage roadsides for safety, plus environmental and visual quality. It will also provide practical experiences in vegetation management such as planting with a native seed drill and hydroseeder.

Lecture Hours: 32

CNS929 Individual Projects

1 credit – This course provides in-depth experiences in conservation. Projects are developed in cooperation with and supervised by the instructor dealing with construction, habitat maintenance, wildlife census, habitat mapping, trail development, observation of conservation boards, etc. It includes paper describing the project from start to finish. Hours of credit depend on the scope and depth of the project.

The course can be taken for 1-3 credits and 32-96 lab hours.

Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in CNS121.

Course Fee: $25.00

COM781 Written Communication in the Workplace

3 credits – This course focuses on composition and editing of curriculum-specific technical and business-related writing projects. Instruction includes formatting, information gathering, document drafting, editing, and written employment strategies.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENG105 Composition I

3 credits – This course emphasizes fluency, thesis-driven organization, the use of supporting details, and research techniques. Writing is approached as a recursive process that includes prewriting strategies, drafting, revising, and editing. The course helps students shape writing to serve readers' needs and define a sense of purpose in their writing. It also gives students strategies for reading college-level material.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENG106 Composition II

3 credits – This course aims to review and extend writing principles learned in ENG105 Composition I to analytical, argumentative, and research-based writing. This course emphasizes critical reading, evaluation, and precise and responsible source citation.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: ENG105 Composition I

ENG106 Composition II

3 credits – This course aims to review and extend writing principles learned in ENG105 Composition I to analytical, argumentative, and research-based writing. This course emphasizes critical reading, evaluation, and precise and responsible source citation.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: ENG105 Composition I

MAT110 Math for Liberal Arts

3 credits – This is a one semester liberal arts mathematics course that satisfies the minimum general education requirement for math. The course is designed to impart math skills which are helpful in everyday life as well as to expose students to areas of mathematics they may not have seen before. Topics include problem-solving skills, set theory, algebra, consumer mathematics, probability, and statistics. Other topics may be included.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT063 Elementary Algebra or equivalent COMPASS score

MAT122 College Algebra

5 credits – Begins a two semester sequence to prepare students for the calculus sequence. The central theme is the concept of functions, their properties, graphs and applications. Functions studied include polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

Lecture Hours: 80

Pre-requisites: MAT102 Intermediate Algebra or equivalent COMPASS score

MAT128 Precalculus

4 credits – This one-semester pre-calculus course is intended for the student with a solid algebra background who intends to take calculus. It is also beneficial (but not required) for the student to have a background in trigonometry. The course will emphasize functions using an analytical, numerical, and graphical approach. The student will study linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions along with their applications.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: Appropriate Placement Test Scores: ACT Math Score of 25 OR Compass Score of 51-100 in the College Algebra Domain or 31-50 in the Trigonometry Domain.

Other Requirements: Successful completion (C or better) of three years of high school mathematics including two years of algebra and one year of geometry and/or trigonometry, or appropriate mathematics placement score.

MAT134 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry

3 credits – This course is the second course of a two-semester pre-calculus sequence. Topics include trigonometry and applications, vectors, analytic geometry, and polar and parametric equations.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT122 College Algebra

MAT156 Statistics

3 credits – This course is a study of descriptive statistics including graphical representation, central tendency, correlation and regression, intuitive treatment of probability, and inferential statistics including hypothesis testing.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate placement score.

MAT210 Calculus I

4 credits – This course is the first in a calculus sequence. The course covers topics including functions and their graphs, limits, derivatives and applications of differentiation, and integrals.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: MAT134 Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry and three years of high school mathematics including trigonometry

MAT216 Calculus II

4 credits – This course is a continuation of MAT-210 Calculus I. The course covers topics including integration techniques related to surface areas and volumes, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: MAT210 Calculus I or equivalent

MAT219 Calculus III

4 credits – This course is a continuation of MAT-216 Calculus II. The course covers topics including integration and differentiation techniques related to vectors, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector analysis.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: MAT216 Calculus II or equivalent

MAT772 Applied Math

3 credits – This course is designed to present basic facts of arithmetic including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, powers, roots, English and metric measurement, ratio-proportion, percents, introduction to algebra, and introduction to geometry. Instruction includes use of scientific hand-held calculators with emphasis placed on critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Lecture Hours: 48

PHI105 Introduction to Ethics

3 credits – This course examines contemporary ethical conflicts and provides a grounding in the language, concepts, and traditions of ethics. This course provides students with the intellectual tools to analyze moral dilemmas in the fields they choose to pursue and participate in as members of society.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY102 Human and Work Relations

3 credits – This course studies self and social behavior. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and application of social science theories and research for the development of effective interpersonal and organizational relationships.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY111 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits – This course provides an introduction to the study of behavior with emphasis in the areas of learning, cognition, motivation, personality, behavioral disorder, therapy, and social influence. An understanding of the impact of both theoretical perspectives and experimental evidence on the formulation of the science of human behavior is also stressed. Psychological theories and principles are utilized to explain and predict behavior.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC110 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits – This course surveys the basic principles, concepts, and research findings of social life from small groups to societies. The course examines a range of sociological explanations for the various forms of social behaviors and establishes a basis for reflection and further study in the field.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC205 Diversity in America

3 credits – This course is an introduction to the sociological study of majority-minority group relations. Focus will be on the basic concepts such as groups, intergroup relations, power, prejudice, and discrimination, as well as social understanding, tolerance, and acceptance. A wide assortment of minority groups, including women, racial, ethnic, the physically and mentally disabled, homosexuals, religious groups, the elderly and the young, and those singled out for their lower socio-economic status will be considered.

Lecture Hours: 48

SPC101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

3 credits – This course presents elements of the oral communications process with emphasis in developing public speaking skill. Students will be involved in activities that provide opportunity for the understanding and improvement of their oral communication skills.

Lecture Hours: 48

 

Program Contacts

Department Secretary

Dianne Lellig
Butler Hall 104
319-296-4011
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Program Advisor

Terri Rogers
Bremer Hall 101-G
319-296-2329 ext.1311
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Dean

Ray Beets
Butler Hall 104-A
319-296-4042
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